Guide Dogs for the Blind

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I was recently in the Bay area with my husband, John, as part of a fundraising effort for the Guide Dogs for the Blind, a school training labrador and golden retrievers to become working dogs. I led a cooking workshop for the recipient of the silent auction item (a gastronomic evening with me) and her fourteen guests. After the interactive culinary class, we enjoyed the three-course dinner together al fresco at Joan Boyd’s home in Napa, owner of Boyd Family Vineyards.

The day before the dinner, John and I visited the GDB campus in San Rafael. It’s a gorgeous campus—I mean, who can beat that California climate and scenery? (Well, I guess the scenery would be of little value to the school’s human students.) It was nonetheless a nice getaway from the Houston heat, and with wine and puppies, what else could I ask for?

John and I got to experience walking with a guide dog (yes, John was blindfolded). We strapped the GoPro to our heads—the footage will later be made into a Blind Life YouTube episode. Best of all, we had puppy playtime! How could you not love those pups pictured above?

A future guide puppy is specifically bred and born in-house at GDB. At about 12 weeks, they meet their raisers, or volunteers all over the country who foster the puppies—socialize them and give them basic training—until they’re over a year old. THen the puppies return to the GDB where they receive additional training to become a guide dog—think of it as their master’s degree.

Owners are matched to dogs by personality, lifestyle, needs, even walking pace. Humans have to be trained on how to work with their guide dogs, too, so potential owners come stay on the GDB campus for two weeks for training. The GDB is set up like a cozy college campus, complete with a cafeteria with customizable menu, individual dorm rooms, a student center/union, a gym, and so on. At the conclusion of the two-week program, there’s even a little graduation ceremony for the dogs, during which they’re officially given over to their new owners. So cute.

I’ve thought a lot about getting a guide dog over the years, and after my visit to the GDB, it has become a more serious consideration. To learn more about the GDB, their mission, programs, opportunities, how to become a puppy raiser, and how you can support, visit the Guide Dogs for the Blind website.

One Comment

  1. Adorable! As mum to a 6 1/2 year od black Lab, I can tell you Labs are extraordinary dogs. They are exceptionally sensitive to their people. They tune in in a way you don’t see with other breeds. If I ever need a guide or service dog, I would get one in a heartbeat. I love the sense of comfort and security I feel having Indy by my side. I feel safer with him looking out for me. Once we had intruders in our carport and he actually came to get me-I was in my studio and on the phone. My best friend fell so in love with Indy, she got his little brother from the same parents, but the next litter.

    Comment by Lelainia Lloyd on August 19, 2014 at 5:48 pm

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