Snowboarding in Whistler

We’ve just returned from what has now become our annual ski trip to Whistler, British Columbia and it was, wait for it…awesome! After years of on again off again learning I finally feel confident enough to call myself a snowboarder. Making such a bold statement is a big deal because for once I’m actually proud of myself.

I’m a snowboarder with NMO.

Neuromyelitis optica has robbed me of so much but it hasn’t taken away my spirit for adventure. Finally comfortable enough to complete blue runs in Whistler, I rarely fell on the mountains. Swooshing down at a max speed of 42 km/hr (there’s an app for that) I completed several hours each day, for 5 straight days in a row.

In your face NMO!

I will confess though; this was the most I’ve pushed myself physically since my major attacks. And yes, it hurt, a lot. On every run my back screamed in pain and my legs tingled till they went numb. I knew it was time to take a break when my body wouldn’t complete anymore turns. It usually resulted in a fall from exhaustion/pain. So why do it? Because the sense of accomplishment and adrenaline is my new drug. It easily outweighs any amount of pain or fear of heights. The ongoing pep talk in my head is an exercise in will power. It is how I have always planned to live with NMO.

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Me boarding one of the back bowls on what was quite a foggy day. The run is called “Burnt Stew Trail”.

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Me, stuck in powder snow. I am laughing hysterically because it was like falling into a cloud.

 

Now, I’ll never be an Olympic snowboarder, but my kid might be.

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Sophie, 3 years old. Having completed a week of ski school.

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Family photo, Whistler, British Columbia, 2016.

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