Nothing Is By Chance

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So…back in early December, I broke a tooth. In less than 24 hours, I had an infection. I happened to be out at UBC the next day for a CIRCLES blood draw and an advisory meeting, so while I was there, I popped into Urgent Care to get some help. (Which in this case was antibiotics.)

Any time I interact with health care professionals, I tend to have to give them a crash course in NMO because 99% of them have never even heard of it. In this case, it was important because I am immunosuppressed, so getting an infection was a big deal. The folks at urgent care were super nice and I was a bit stunned that in less than 10 minutes from the time I walked in the door, I was being seen.  I was in and out in less than half an hour. That never happens!

Landon, the nurse who was looking after me was really interested in learning about NMO when it came up as I was giving my medical information. I love sharing information when someone is open to learning from their patients. You know you’re in good hands when your health care providers listen to you and treat you as a partner in your care. As a patient, that level of respect is deeply appreciated. We had a good talk about NMO and I gave him my card so he could connect to NMODiaries and the Guthy-Jackson Foundation.

In mid-January, I received an email from Landon out of the blue. It turns out, he does a medical podcast about ER nursing called NursEM, which has subscribers worldwide. He next podcast was going to be on MS and he felt that it was important to talk about NMO since people with NMO are often mis-diagnosed with MS. Because NMO is so rare, he realized that it was likely someone would know his patient was me, so for confidentiality reasons, he wanted to ask my permission to talk about our paths crossing. I knew his podcast would help spread awareness for NMO, so of course I said yes.

The podcast is available in both English and French and you can download it for free here. It’s episode #14 MS/NMO. He and his co-host begin by talking about MS being Canada’s disease and about some research Dr. Traboulsee at UBC is doing. (Landon’s partner accidentally kept referring to him Dr. Traboulski which cracked me up.) Landon talks about NMO around the 18 minute mark, but it’s worth listening to the whole podcast.

If you’d like to learn a bit more about Landon, you can read about him here. I just discovered he’s a Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee medal recipient too! Small world!

You just never know whose path you are going to cross! I am grateful to have met Landon and that he chose to take what he learned from our meeting and share it with a wider audience. Someone listening to his podcast could use that information to help an NMO patient in an ER room somewhere, someday. Awareness is everything and allies are priceless.

Note: I know everyone probably expected me to post about NMO Patient Day in LA. I haven’t forgotten and will talk about it next time. Promise!
21
Mar 2016
POSTED BY Lelainia Lloyd
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