Season 4 of Four Senses, my cooking show, currently airs on AMI TV

Since winning MasterChef U.S. Season 3 in 2012, I’ve gone on to co-host my own cooking show. Our studio shoot is in Toronto, which gives me the chance to visit with Jenna at least once a year.

Something of which a lot of people may not be aware is that a TV show’s shoot schedule is often highly intense and squeezed in to a short amount of time. One season of Four Senses, for example, is thirteen 30-minute episodes. We shoot two episodes a day (each one taking about 4 hours to shoot), and we film them all in seven days straight. The reason for this is it’s often very expensive to rent studio space and film equipment, plus everyone on cast and crew are contractors that have other work projects scheduled, so a producer can only snag people for X amount of time.

Many people I meet assume we are shooting each episode the day before it airs, or sometimes, people even think it’s live television (like in the case of MasterChef, people would meet me in the street while it was airing and be confused why I wasn’t in the kitchen that day).

There’s a whole different world called “television.”

I can’t believe it’s been five years since my season of MasterChef shot and aired, and four years since I started Four Senses, a cooking show with an accessible twist. Season 4 is currently airing on AMI TV in Canada on Thursdays at 7:30 PM ET/PT, but if you miss an episode or don’t live in Canada, you can catch the episodes online at AMI’s Four Senses website.

Happy watching and cooking!

16
Jan 2017
POSTED BY Christine
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Recap of my recent trip to Canada

Christine Ha and Carl Heinrich, hosts of Four Senses on AMI

Processed with VSCOWith my co-host, Carl Heinrich, owner of Richmond Station in Toronto and season 2 winner of Top Chef Canada

I was in Canada the second half of September filming the fourth season of my accessible cooking show, Four Senses. TV is much less glamorous than one would think: I get picked up around 6:45 AM every morning. We film two episodes a day, which has me on my feet for most of it, while trying to be energetic, making conversation with our guests, cooking, and then throwing scripted lines to camera. Because I’m vision impaired, I have to memorize my throws and try to find the camera with my eyes at the same time. This was what I did for seven days straight, as we filmed our entire 13-episode season in 7 days. Then after we wrap each day, I have a meeting with our director, producer, and my co-host to go over the next day’s scripts. Then I grab a quick bite and then study the next day’s scripts and guest bios until I finally get to bed around 11 or midnight. Then I wake up before sunrise and do it all over again.

All that said, being part of the industry has given me a new appreciation for the efforts that go into making a TV show. production is definitely labor intensive, and it takes a strong, hardworking team with everyone doing their job to pull it off. A production is only as strong as its weakest link. This season, our team consisted of 23 cast and crew.

What I like about television is the challenges it’s posed. TV really forced me out of my comfort zone—I’m an introvert and not naturally great on camera—and it’s gratifying to work hard together and know we’re doing something that helps others. In our case, it’s making educational entertainment that challenges those who are vision impaired to regain independence by returning to the kitchen.

I had a few days off in between my field shoots and studio run, so I got to see Jenna, her husband Mike, and their daughter Sophie. It was a rainy day, but we managed to grab lunch and some drinks at Mill St. Brewing before I attempted to hit hockey pucks in the downpour. (It was the hockey World Cup, and Toronto’s Distillery District had been transformed into a cocky village complete with carnival stations..)

The rest of our afternoon was spent traversing the mall downtown. My hubs, John, bought a Blue Jays hat, and Jenna and I combed Aritzia while our men discussed with disbelief about how long women can take in a single store.

As always, Jenna and I talked about the goings-on in our lives, how we’re doing with the Neuromyelitis Optica/NMO, and then made sarcastic remarks about everything else. It’s nice to hang out with people who get our illness but whom don’t make it the center of conversation. We may have NMO, but NMO doesn’t always need to have us.

Overall, I had a good experience in Canada (with the exception of some piss-pour service from Air Canada, but I’ll save that for another time). I’ll end this recap with a few notable observations which, I hope, you’ll find amusing more than anything.

What I learned about Canada, Canadians, and Toronto in 2016

  1. Bears are a common sighting during the fall season. Apparently they’re searching for food to fatten themselves up before winter hibernation.
  2. People who live in Toronto are called Torontonians. Despite what I, a Houstonian, might have thought, Torontonians do not eat poutin every day. In fact, they only ingest it late at night after many drinks.
  3. Torontonians really love their Blue Jays. Unfortunately, I was told Toronto now holds the record for North American city with the longest streak without any sports championships. (The former record holder was Cleveland, but the Cavaliers had changed that.)
  4. Three Canadian snacks you should try are ketchup chips, all dressed chips, and coffee crisps.
  5. Many Canadians are wary of Texans. (Believe me when I say not all Texans open-carry guns and support Trump.)
  6. Whenever they find out I’m American, almost every Canadian without fail brings up Trump. Please know I’d much rather talk about Netflix shows, dogs, and poutin.
  7. September is a great time to be in Toronto because the weather is amazing. Get your breezy, sunny days now before the harsh winter sets in.
  8. Toronto has great food. You can get fine dining, French, Caribbean, Japanese, Chinese, Spanish, and American all within a few city blocks.

Till next time, Canada…xoxo!

P.S. Here’s an interview I did with CBC Toronto’s Dwight Drummond about Four Senses.

Four Senses season 4 cast and crew

It takes a village to make a TV show.

My cooking show, Four Senses, is returning for a fourth season

Christine & Carl Four Senses 2 (Varner Productions Limited)

My co-host, Top Chef season 2 winner Carl Heinrich, and me in front of our Le Creuset adorned set

Next week, I’ll fly to Toronto, Canada, to begin production of season 4 of Four Senses, a cooking show geared towards the vision impaired and novice cook. The show airs on Accessible Media, Inc or AMI, but even if you aren’t Canadian and don’t get this channel, you can catch the show on AMI’s website, complete with a fully accessible media player.

If you asked me a couple of years ago if I’d ever thought I’d have a cooking show going for four seasons, I would’ve shrugged and said, “Who knows?” If you would’ve asked me five years ago if I thought I’d ever be on TV, I would’ve laughed in your face. It goes to show you just never know with life—both good and bad things happen to us during the course of our lifetimes, and all we can do is make the most of them.

Every season has gotten better and better, and I attribute it to more support; growing funding; and, perhaps most of all, a stronger and more experienced team of cast and crew. I think you’ll be able to tell the difference in caliber if you watch our first season versus our third and most recent.

I’m looking forward to yet another season. People often don’t realize how much hard work goes into producing a television series—one 30-minute episode takes at least four hours of filming (and that’s not including the out-of-studio field pieces we shoot on a different day, plus the hours of post-production editing). Being in the entertainment industry is not as glamorous as one may think, but I love what I do—it’s the best feeling to wrap a shoot and know that all the hard work everyone put in together will result in something great. It’s an exemplary example of how teamwork is essential to success.

I won’t get too much time off—we shoot our in-studio portions of the season seven days straight (which is how most television production schedules go)—but when I do have a little downtime, I’ll be vlogging and visiting with Jenna.

Canada, here I come!

06
Sep 2016
POSTED BY Christine
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Guest Blogger Lisa McDaniel talks about: Why she is a strong advocate for NMO Patients

Why?

Why do you do it? How can you work with NMO patients after you lost your son to this horrible disease? Those are questions I hear quite often as I work within the Guthy Jackson Charitable Foundation as well as from those in my personal life. There is a simple yet complicated answer. The simple answer is I do it because I care and because it is important to me. The complicated answer goes much deeper.

For those who don’t know our story, I will give you the short version. Our son, Collin, was barely 5 in 2007 when he first lost his vision. It took a few months before he was diagnosed with NMO. His course was very severe with constant flare ups of optic neuritis as well as transverse myelitis. After 4.5 years of suffering and fighting with everything he had within him, Collin passed away on March 29, 2012, at 9.5 years old (we must remember the .5 according to what he always told us). Yes, it is a very sad story if you stop there. Of course, we were and are still heartbroken and we still miss him tremendously. However, those who have followed this story and lived it with us know our story did not stop after his death.

A google search in early 2008, led me to very negative information about NMO. It also led me to an email group where I met some amazing people online. Those people became my family’s lifeline and helped me to learn everything I needed to know about NMO. I learned about the correct medications for NMO, the differences between medications for a flare-up versus medications for prevention of future flare-ups, what to look for to recognize a flare and other things NMO patients and families need to learn. The information I learned was great, however, well beyond the information I gleaned was the sense of support and family I received.

In 2009, I was able to attend the first ever NMO Patent Day in Los Angeles, CA. It was overwhelming as well as amazing. It was the first time our NMO community had been able to come together outside of the email support group. I met and interacted with doctors who took an interest in Collin and did their best to help us figure out the right combination of medications for him. I remember leaving LA filled with hope for the first time since Collin had been diagnosed. I vowed then to attend every Patient Day I could.

Throughout the years of Collin’s battle, I became close to many of the patients and families, as well as doctors in the NMO community. When Collin passed away, it was devastating to our family, however, it was also devastating to the extended “family” we had met through NMO. It was at then I knew I had to stay in contact with those incredible people, but I also knew it was time to change the role I was in with them. It was time I gave back to them a little of what they had given me and my family. Not long after Collin’s death, I had the opportunity to go to work with the Guthy Jackson Charitable Foundation as the Consulting Advocate.

I am honored to be able to serve the NMO community. I love working with the patients and families as they seek information and support. One of the best things about working with the families is empowering them with knowledge and helping them learn to advocate. Advocacy is very important when a rare disease is involved, whether it is advocating for a loved one or for one’s self. As we build knowledge, we can build awareness in the world and with awareness, a diagnosis may be quicker. Education is important so patients know when to call their doctors and fight for what is needed. We don’t need to have huge plans and goals to advocate, we only need to make our minds up to take any size action. To quote Edward Everett Hale, “I am only one, but I am one. I cannot do everything, but I can do something. And I will not let what I cannot do interfere with what I can do.”

It is incredible to make a difference in the lives of others. It amazes me how I am called upon to help educate doctors and medical staff about NMO, which in turn helps future patients. I am just a simple mom who wants to make a difference and wants to continue fighting a battle one little boy started. I, like Victoria Jackson, am just a mom on a mission! I have a heart for my NMO family and I have a passion for helping them. That doesn’t make me special, it just makes me willing. I am humbled to continue the work Collin led me to. I am not writing this to toot my own horn, but rather to share a beautiful story with you. Realize, this story is not about me, but about what can happen when a life is changed. If you want to know anything about Collin at all, know he was an incredibly compassionate child and I have no doubt at all he would want me to be helping those who are going through the disease which took his life. I am not stronger or better than anyone reading this and everyone is capable of doing what I do.

Another way Collin encouraged me to make a difference was through The Collin McDaniel Hope Foundation. My family and I started CMHF along with our Co-founder, Johnnie Sue Gilbert, whose son Nathan is living with NMO. It is our mission to make life just a touch easier for families who have children diagnosed with NMO. CMHF helps with medications, travel, wheelchair ramps and other things children diagnosed with NMO may need. While it is a small non-profit, we have been able to help many families in the last 3 years.

While my work is incredibly painful at times, it is also incredibly rewarding. Why do I choose to do it? All because God chose me to be the mom of one little red headed boy who changed my life and touched immeasurable others in his short life. To me, this is Collin’s legacy and that is the real answer to the question, “Why?”.

Teaching blind and low vision students how to cook

**This entry was originally published on Christine’s blog.

Last April, I was invited to teach a cooking workshop at the W Ross MacDonald School in Brantford, Ontario, Canada. A little background on WRMS: founded in 1872, the school teaches blind and blind-deaf students from grades K through 12. There are currently around 200 enrolled students.

With a grant received from the Ministry of Education in Ontario, WRMS created a Healthier Eating Program with the purpose of teaching students the importance of health and nutrition. As part of the program, I was asked to lead a one-day workshop and teach some of the cooking students how to independently prepare a nutritious meal. Many of the students were going to graduate and begin university soon, so as in the spirit of education, there was an emphasis on fostering independent thought and action.

So what should we cook together as a class?

There’s a careful process for curating a menu, whether it be for a fancy gala, an intimate dinner, a festive party, or (in this case) a student workshop. You have to consider your audience; understand the event; and know what’s available in terms of ingredients, equipment, and abilities of the cooks. For this workshop, my audience was high school students with no or limited vision. Soon they will be living on modest college students’ income, so the ingredients and equipment required couldn’t be expensive. I wanted the recipes to be easy so as to not intimidate, yet delicious enough for them to enjoy and want to revisit in their own kitchens. I also needed to encompass the different food groups to provide an array of nutrition. In considering all of these parameters, I decided to teach them how to make Peruvian-style baked chicken with green chile sauce, roasted vegetables, and rice pudding with orange zest for dessert.

Here’s a little known fact about me: I love chicken on the bone. I love gnawing all the meat and cartilage off chicken. The hubs makes fun of me because in the time I take to eat one chicken wing, he’s eaten four. My favorite part of the chicken are the leg quarters, because dark meat is juicy and delicious. It also is more forgiving during cooking, which means it’s harder to overcook. I requested the students cook with chicken leg quarters, but their teacher informed me she’s had trouble getting them to eat unfamiliar things like beans (yes, beans!), so bone-in meat may not go over well with the kids.

“They may get squeamish about it,” she said.

What???

After I thought about it, I decided to refuse the substitution for boneless, skinless chicken thighs. I explained that people need to know where their food comes from: that meat comes from animals that were once living and not from a rectangular styrofoam container at the supermarket.

I said, “I want the students to respect their food.”

The teacher agreed and said hopefully since the “words of wisdom” would be coming from me and not her, maybe they’ll listen.

On the day of the workshop, I actually didn’t get any squeamish vibes from the students when they had to touch the raw bone-in chicken legs. I told them why it’s best to use whole chicken or at least chicken parts most intact and closest to resembling a whole chicken. Since it wasn’t a butchering class (and honestly, I’m not the greatest butcher), we settled on chicken leg quarters.

After the food finished, we all sat down to eat, and everyone enjoyed the mealtime together.

“Best of all,” I said, “you cooked it yourselves!”

The teacher and some of the students were so touched by my inspiring presence, that when they told me how much my time there meant to them, I felt in turn incredibly blessed. It’s always nice to be reminded why I’ve been given the position to advocate for the blind.

This experience of teaching the students at W Ross MacDonald School convinced me I want to open a cooking school one day for both children and adults. Maybe
That’ll be my mission after opening a restaurant and publishing my memoir. I never thought of myself as a teacher, but since my philosophy is to always try new things in life, perhaps opening a cooking school is in my destiny.

21
Jun 2016
POSTED BY Christine
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Acceptance, Awareness, Advocacy

Christine delivers lecture, Syracuse

Christine delivers the commemorative lecture for Asian-American & Pacific Islander Heritage Month at Syracuse University

This month, I’ve been and will be doing a couple of talks at universities in celebration of Asian-American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month. I’m constantly reminded of how I’ve been given this platform to advocate and raise awareness for those often socially marginalized—particularly women, Asian-Americans, the vision impaired, and the disabled. Winning “MasterChef” was cool, but I’m well aware of the bigger picture. Like Spiderman, “With great power comes great responsibility.”

Even the books I’m reading—A Spool of Blue Thread by Anne Tyler and The Light of the World by Elizabeth Alexander—touch upon the “other”: the elderly and adopted, in the case of the former, and the grieving and diasporist, as in the latter. Literature exists to help us understand others who are not like us; like food and the arts, it serves a connective purpose, exposing the universality of humankind, however frayed.

I think about this phenomenon often—the coexistence of both the celebrated differences yet commonality we all have as humans—and it makes certain things that much more important.

Because I was an only child and lost my mother when I was fourteen, I learned to be independent from an early age. When I was diagnosed with Neuromyelitis Optica/NMO when I was in my mid-twenties and lost my vision, it was very difficult for me to accept the fact that I could no longer drive my own car and shop for my own groceries. My independence was the casualty of my NMO, and it took a long time—probably five years or so—for the final acceptance of my diagnosis.

When I was first diagnosed with NMO twelve years ago, it was still called Devic’s disease, and the only resources I could find online were one-pagers from the University of California, San Francisco, and a practice in the United Kingdom. That’s it. There was no Guthy Jackson Foundation, no NMO support groups, no NMO Diaries blog.

It became not just a desire, but a necessity, to raise awareness about NMO. I was tired of everything assuming I had multiple sclerosis or, better yet, scoliosis. It bothered me that nobody knew what NMO was, including medical staff I came across at various hospitals and clinics. I’m okay with NMO being considered a rare disease, but I did not like that it was an orphan disease.

My blog, The Blind Cook, was started in part because I wanted to raise awareness about NMO. In fact, my very first post for the blog on July 23, 2010, was entitled “Living with NMO” and discussed my new treatment plan. I’ve spoken about NMO at all my keynotes, and I’ve helped out with various GJCF fundraisers and events.

I believe we all have at least one thing we’re passionate about, and our purpose in life is to be an advocate for such things. I care about the literary arts, the culinary arts, the blind community, the disadvantaged, physical and mental health, my family and friends. These are the things for which I fight and bleed.

Maybe you haven’t found what you’re passionate about or what you’re meant to do in life, but I urge you to keep looking. The happiest people are those who feel they have a purpose on this earth. Once you accept, you become aware, and then you’re ready to advocate.

12
Apr 2016
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Four Senses, my cooking show for the blind, premieres this Thursday, January 14th, on AMI

Once or twice a year, I fly up to Jenna’s neck of the continent and shoot my cooking show in Ontario. Together with Carl Heinrich, winner of “Top Chef” Canada season 2 and chef and owner of acclaimed Richmond Station, I host Four Senses, a cooking show on AMI TV for the blind.

I’m excited to announce the third season premieres this Thursday, January 14th, at 7:30 PM EST/PST!

After three seasons together, Carl and I are like old siblings, as you can tell from the above and below promo clips. In all jest, we fully respect each other and, more importantly, have fun together. You can witness the camaraderie growing between us over the seasons.

For the first time ever, I’ll also be doing a live Q&A on AMI’s Facebook page alongside the premiere, so tune in this Thursday at 7:30 PM on AMI TV and/or AMI’s Facebook and ask me anything! Tune in, and chat soon!

11
Jan 2016
POSTED BY Christine
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TV, Travel, and the Importance of Sleep

Judgment
I just returned last week from a month-long stay in Vietnam to film MasterChef Vietnam season 3—yes, I’m now officially a full-fledged judge of the MC franchise!—and this week, I leave for Canada to film part of season 3 of Four Senses, my cooking show in Canada.

Yesterday, my cousin, who is also a doctor, called me to ask how my health was faring.

“The family is worried about you getting a flare-up because you seem to be overworked,” she said.

I did come down with the flu while filming in Vietnam, and because production doesn’t stop for anybody unless there’s blood spewing from the eyes, I still had to shoot with fever, cough, and a loss of voice. In spite of this, I have been blessed to remain free of Neuromyelitis Optica/NMO attacks.

How do I do it?

Well, first of all, it’s probably a lot of sheer dumb luck.

Secondly, having lived with NMO for over ten years, I’ve learned to monitor my symptoms quite well. I know my body can no longer handle functioning on no sleep, the way I used to in my twenties from studying (or, more realistically, partying) all night. I’ve learned that as soon as I feel pain in the back of my eye, I need to pause from life, sleep, and take it easy before a bout of optic neuritis sets in. Of course, everyone’s NMO symptoms and flare-ups manifest differently, so I suggest you keep a health journal to log what sorts of things precede your attacks, how they begin, how long they tend to last, which courses of treatment are most effective, and so on.

For me, rest and relaxation are now a top priority, whether in the form of physical sleep or mental respite. This has helped me keep countless NMO exacerbations at bay. Unfortunately, the frequent travel I do for work makes it incredibly difficult to maintain a normal sleeping schedule. On top of that, I am susceptible to poor sleep and sometimes insomnia. While I don’t recommend this for everyone, I do find a little assistance from an over-the-counter sleep aid helps me regulate my sleeping pattern, especially when traveling internationally. I make sure, however, I don’t become dependent on sleep aids—I’ll only take them when I fly overseas or if I hadn’t had good, straight sleep for several nights in a row—and I only take half or a third of a dosage. Make sure to consult with your physician first before adding anything new to your pill intake.

Many people think my life is glamorous, and while it’s pretty awesome to be able to fly to Canada, Vietnam, and Singapore in two months’ time, and to be doing stuff I truly love, keep in mind it’s still work, and it’s hard work at that. Production often has me on my feet, “turning it on” for cameras ten to fifteen hours a day for, in the case of MasterChef Vietnam, 21 days straight. Sure, this can take a toll on anyone’s health, but I prioritize health and happiness above all else, and that’s helped me accomplish much without sacrificing well-being.

14
Sep 2015
POSTED BY Christine
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An intimate interview with Nancy Reimer, NMO Advocate

This week we’d like to showcase another “Mom on a Mission” Nancy Reimer, who is the mastermind behind the very first dedicated NMO (neuromyelitis optica) Walk/Run. It’s difficult not to cry reading her candid response to our very intimate questions. Always honest, sincere and tough, Nancy took time to respond to our questions from her home in British Columbia, Canada.

nancy

1. What motivated you to start the first NMO dedicated walk/run?

I think if I am being completely honest, my motivation for starting the first NMO dedicated Walk/Run was anger and grief. We all have our own ways of dealing with the tough stuff in life and for me I felt like if I did not find a positive outlet for my feelings of anger and grief surrounding Riley’s diagnosis, that I would likely go under and not resurface. It was excruciating as a Mom to go through that first year and to not have a diagnosis really until his fourth relapse. To hear the words “no cure” almost did me in, however, it was around that time that the idea to have an event specific to NMO entered my mind. Organizing this event gave me a positive focus…something that I could do in my own community to raise awareness and funding specifically for Neuromyelitis Optica. When I started planning the event, I was surprised that there were others with the diagnosis who immediately reached out to me. It then became something that extended out much further than Riley’s diagnosis.

2. Were you always planning to make it an annual event?

I remember the final weeks leading up to the first ever event thinking, “what if nobody comes”. Silly really, because so many had registered…we ended up with around 400 that first year. I think my thought process was to just see how year one went…then year two…and now we are leading up to year three! Never in my wildest dreams did I imagine that it would ever go beyond year one. It has become this incredible place of support for those who live with NMO and their families. This event has given us all something that we “CAN” do to make a difference. We cannot change the diagnosis, but we can rally together with our supporters and be there for each other while we educate our communities about NMO.

3. What improvements to the event are you planning for this year?

Each year I look at what worked and what did not. I have to say that both years so far have been pretty darn amazing. Last year we added a few more sponsors, a KidZone and onsite yoga classes. We were also delighted to have a local dance school come and do a flash mob at our event. The onsite Sponsors are incredible and most have been with us since year one. When looking for Sponsors, you are asking people/businesses in the community to believe in both the cause and that your event will succeed. You never know what kind of support exists unless you are willing to ask. So for this year, we have all of our amazing Sponsors coming back, some fantastic post-race entertainment and snacks…don’t forget the snacks!!!!

4. Fundraising certainly has its challenges. What advice would you give to those who do so yearly? How do you keep it relevant and fresh?

Fundraising has been a challenge. I struggled a lot with this aspect of the event last year. Our registration fees are part of our fundraising efforts and that is the easy part, but asking for donations above and beyond has, in the past, been a challenge. When you are asking people or businesses to donate, I have found that most need to have that personal connection to the cause for them to fully be able to identify with it. Unfortunately, many do not identify with Neuromyelitis Optica. Some are willing to listen, while others are not. I have learned to give a brief synopsis of the disease and leave a letter with more details and unfortunately, unless they take the time to read the letter or our personal story, I rarely hear back. That was tough for a few of us last year but then as we started to really look at the event, it occurred to us that maybe that’s not what this event is about. Yes, it is so amazing to be able to contribute financially to the cause and ultimately the cure, but maybe our event serves a different purpose. There is nothing that has been so healing to me as standing before that “sea of green” and seeing that visual support all at once. It is several communities standing together, unified in their support of a cause…our cause. There is not a price tag for that…the support onsite on event day is priceless!!!! To me, if I can provide that for the people who have this diagnosis, then I have done my job well.

5. Riley is another year older so he’s another year wiser. How do you feel this event impacts him on a personal level?

This is a tough one. Riley does not often verbalize what he feels about his diagnosis or about the event. He was only 7 when NMO entered his world and I think for him the event has just become a part of that. Perhaps as he gets older, he will realize more, like I have, the magnitude of the support that stands before him and that this event came to be because he was diagnosed with Neuromyelitis Optica. It was created based on his personal diagnosis. For Riley, life has really normalized in the past couple years. The beginning of May marks 3 years of stability for him. That is huge. I remember the panic of that first year and I wondered if this disease would ever give him a break or if it would be a lifetime of relapses, hospitals and rehab centres. I remember the severity of some of his relapses and wondered if he would live, if he would move, if he would walk again, if he would be able to see…we’ve come a long way baby!!! I am beyond grateful for his stability and he is very blessed to have an amazing team of Doctors that have made it their priority to keep him that way.

riley

6. To quote the Guthy-Jackson Foundation, you’re another “Mom on a mission”. How do you stay inspired and motivated?

My motivation wakes up in the room across the hall from me every morning. I walk in to see the mop of curls on his pillow. My heart still skips a beat when he does not respond right away. I have learned over the past few years, what it means to be a “Mom on a Mission”. Simply put, a Mom on a Mission is a woman driven by something that puts her child/children in danger, and will fight to the ends of the earth to change that for her child/children. I have had that feisty attitude my whole life and I am learning now to channel it into something good. Both of my children know, without a doubt, that I will always fight for them and will bulldoze anything, Neuromyelitis Optica included, that puts them in danger. The last couple of years have been hard for me. Once I got through that initial flurry of the first year full of attacks, diagnosis and then, finally, stability, I saw the damage…the backlash of the ordeal. The thing is, when you are fighting for a child, your child, you do not feel the plummet to the bottom of the totem pole. I was not a priority and have suffered more than most know, as I have become quite good at just carrying on with life. A car accident in the midst of all of this, just added to that by introducing chronic pain into my body. This year so far has been about healing me. I am, as best as I can, making myself and my own health and recovery, a priority. I still have moments where I plummet, but I never camp there for very long. I have a job to do and in order to do that; I need to be the strongest, healthiest version of me. My motivation now reaches around the globe. My fight is no longer just about my child anymore. It is about every person, anywhere, who has received diagnosis the of Neuromyelitis Optica. We are this amazing family and I honestly do not know how I have lived my life up to this point without these incredible people in my life. I am inspired and motivated daily by the people who were brought into my life through this diagnosis. I am so very proud to be a part of a rare disease family that together will find a cure for Neuromyelitis Optica…I truly believe that!!!!

7. Tell us how people can get involved and all the details of this year’s event.

7. You can get involved in our event by being there if you are able to do so. For those who cannot be physically there, we added a Virtual Participant option to our registration, last year, which allows anyone…anywhere in the world, to register for $10 and support our event and the cause. To symbolize that support, I write all of the virtual participant’s names on my shirt and wear it to the event so it is as if you are there. My goal this year would be to have a really full shirt of names. Our event supports two charities… The UBC NMO Clinic and Research Program and the Guthy-Jackson Charitable Foundation. Donation links to both are available on our family website along with the link to register for our event.
You can visit our website to register, make a donation or view our videos, photos and press from years 1 and 2 of our NMO Walk/Run. nomorenmo.com

Four Senses season 2: And it’s a wrap!

I returned home to Houston last week from a three-week stint as a Torontonian/Canadian while filming the sophomore season of the cooking show, Four Senses, which I co-host with Carl Heinrich of Top Chef Canada and Richmond Station.

Production, I’ve learned from being on MasterChef season 3 in 2012 and now Four Senses, is hard work. It’s long days of being on your feet virtually the entire time, and even if you’re exhausted, you have to ramp up the energy level to 200% (because it will only come across as 100% on camera). Over the 22 days, I only had four days off (in the industry, we call them “dark days”)—but even two out of those four days I was flying to Indiana on other business, so it felt more like two days off out of 22.

But as the cliche goes, good things don’t come easily. I must say, there is nothing quite like the satisfaction you feel after someone (this year, it was Carl) yells, “It’s a wrap, everyone!”

Production takes a lot of teamwork: the producers guide the creative concept, the director and assistant director (called the AD for short) guides the execution of the episodes, the production coordinator and assistants take care of all the behind-the-scenes work, the culinary or kitchen team prepares and styles the food, the camera and sound crew gear up the technical equipment, the cast are the on-camera talent, the hair/makeup artist makes sure all the talent looks camera-ready, and so on. No doubt it takes a small village to put together a small show.

For those of you who don’t know what the show is all about, here’s a great article on “Four Senses” written by Rita DeMontis from the Toronto Sun. “Four Senses” is an original AMI TV cooking series designed to inspire vision impaired and sighted novice cooks to get excited about creations in the kitchen. What makes “Four Senses” unique is the descriptive video component is built right into the show instead of in post-production—this means no awkwardly placed voiceovers describing what I’m doing on the small screen but rather I will tell you exactly what I’m doing using specific descriptive words. This makes the cooking show and recipes easier to follow for the vision impaired audience. And recipes are available online in fully accessible format (because, let’s face it, who in their right mind cooks along with the TV chef at the very same time?).

Did you watch FS season 1? What are your thoughts? What cooking shows or aspects of particular shows do you like or dislike? Would love to take your feedback into consideration if we get renewed for a third season.

FS season 2 will air in January 2015 on AMI in Canada. And for many of you from all over the world who have asked, yes, FOur Senses will soon be available online for all to watch! Stay tuned…

Wrap photo of cast & crew

 

 

30
Sep 2014
POSTED BY Christine
POSTED IN

career, Food, Rock star!

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