Thoughts on my recent diplomatic work in Jordan

Women's initiative event

Showing Jordanian women how to make buttermilk biscuits

I just returned from a culinary diplomacy tour hosted by the U.S. Embassy Jordan in Amman. It was my first time to the Middle East, and I thoroughly enjoyed it in spite of the turmoil happening in neighboring Syria. The people I met in Jordan were friendly and hospitable, the food fantastic, and the overall experience memorable. I ate the national dish of Jordan, mansaf, which consists of braised lamb shank, rice, and a fermented goat milk sauce. I ate falafel, shawarma, kibbeh, kofta, kebabs, hummus, labneh, tabbouleh, and tomatoes stewed in amazing olive oil called galayet. Perhaps two of the most memorable things I tasted were eggplant and kanafeh. The eggplants were often grilled or roasted and tasted superb—never before had I loved eggplant as much as in Jordan. They would be mashed into yogurt or tahini and made into a dip called moutabel. Kanafeh is an Arabic dessert consisting of melty cheese topped with crispy vermicelli-like pastry, doused in rose syrup, and garnished with pistachios. I loved it, and I’m not even a sweets person.

But I digress…

Mansaf

Mansaf, the national dish of Jordan

While in Jordan, I participated in several events with key messages ranging from women’s empowerment, disability awareness, and youth culinary education. The main takeaways I tried to leave behind were the universality of food and, thus, the relations between America and Jordan and, therefore, humankind.

Petra

Petra: one of the 7 wonders of the world & where Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade was filmed

Every time I am invited to participate in events like these, I am reminded of the bigger picture of my life: that is, I lost my vision, which made my story and accomplishments unique on MasterChef, which allowed me to achieve a certain amount of fame, which I can then use to raise awareness and advocate for social issues like the rights of women, Asian-Americans, and those living with disabilities and/or vision loss. I am also reminded of my fortunate circumstances in that, being a Texan, I was provided certain resources through the Division for Blind Services at the Texas Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services; without this agency, I would not have been able to receive orientation and mobility training, learned how to use computer screen readers, go back to school for my MFA, relearn how to cook, and live a more independent life. I feel lucky that I come from a place where such support is available. In countries like the Dominican Republic, where I also recently visited, and Jordan, such resources are still in their infant stages, if they even exist at all.

Arabic dishes

Our dinner spread of Arabic dishes

My message today is just to remind us of our blessings and that the world can still use our help, no matter our abilities and backgrounds. You don’t have to fly to the Middle East for Embassy work; you can just start with small things. Donate $20 to a charity in whose mission you believe. Educate your friends, family, and community of a cause about which you feel strongly. Identify your gifts and talents, find your passion issues, and think of a way to contribute. They don’t have to be big leaps. Remember that all movements started with one person taking one small step forward.

Dead Sea

Dead Sea: A mini-holiday between days of work

I truly believe it’s this attitude that has helped me remain resilience throughout my setbacks with Neuromyelitis Optica/NMO and vision loss. We feel the most joy when our lives have purpose. Today I challenge you to do one small kind thing for someone else. If we could all think and act this way, maybe one day, there will be peace in the Middle East.

Kanafeh

In Amman, I fell in love with kanafeh.

17
Apr 2017
POSTED BY Christine
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The Holiday Season is Here!

As I am gearing up for the next few weeks it’s going to be very busy time. First I would like to wish everyone a Happy Thanksgiving! We are traveling to Kansas to see my husband’s family this year for 4 days. This time of the year just seems like chaos for everyone till after New Year’s. As NMO patients this can be challenging for us trying to keep up with everything and trying to take of ourselves. I know for me this time of year is very exhausting and for that I need to thank Starbucks since I will be visiting them everyday till after New Year’s.  Once we get back from Kansas I will be decorating the house for Christmas. I am one of those weird people that put up four Christmas trees because I love Christmas trees! Also it’s that time of the year for Elf on the Shelf to appear and this year we are having another elf joining our elf Buddy I love doing elf on the shelf even though I stress about it too much some times. The look on Allen’s face is just worth it every morning when he is looking for Buddy. The following weekend we are staying downtown for one night and will be watching the Christmas lights parade. Then it will be my 35th birthday which I am absolutely dreading to me that means I am 5 years closer to being 40. I think I will have a hard time with that one well I know I will. I recently watched that movie “This is 40.” Yes I will be like her and will be celebrating my 38th birthday for several years. Four days after my birthday I will be doing my Rituxan which we all know that’s a party in its self. Which means I will not be feeling well for a couple weeks. The next thing on my schedule is my husband’s company Christmas party. Which means Eric and I will be wrapping about twenty gifts for the Christmas party gift raffle. Also squeezing in wrapping all the gifts for the kids and family members. I am hoping I will have time to do Christmas cookies with the kids. Started this tradition with Allen ever since he was a baby. Alana was not into it last year but I think this year she will be more into it. Well at least eating the frosting out of the bowl when I am not looking. Then before I know it will be Christmas. We are staying home this year for Christmas so the kids can enjoy playing with their toys.

Even though it will be a hectic time of the year, I am very thankful for the many blessing in my life such as my family. I think we all can to relate to that when it’s the holiday time we forget what matters the most sometimes.

 

 

Washington D.C and Dr.Levy

Two weeks ago I had an Appointment with Dr. Michael Levy at John Hopkins. Since Eric and I were traveling all the way from Colorado we decided to Make a long weekend trip and see some of the Monuments in Washington D.C. It was my first time to the east coast and it has been over 10 years since Eric was there. We decided it would be best to leave the kids at home and enjoy a couple’s getaway.

 

Our flight left late Wednesday night and we flew into Dulles we arrived at 11:30 p.m. Time we got the rental car and drove to the hotel which was in Old town Alexandria in Virginia. It was 1:00 a.m. so we were exhausted. Thursday morning we slept in little and woke up and explored Old town for a while and had breakfast before heading into D.C. We decided to take the metro train into D.C so we didn’t have to worry about parking and traffic. We got off the train at the National Archives and walked through the National Mall heading to the Washington Monument. I couldn’t believe all the museums at the National Mall. You could spend weeks going through all the Smithsonian Malls and other museums. As we approached the Washington Memorial it was just incredible how tall it was and all the different people from around the world was just staring up to the top of it.

 

Next we walked down to the World War II monument that was very beautiful to see and peaceful. As we headed to the Lincoln memorial we walked right along the reflecting pool. Which is way bigger in person then what you see on TV. When we were at the bottom of the Lincoln memorial I was thinking how am I going to climb all these steps since my NMO Symptoms are starting to hurt from walking so much? I have been walking a ton and I didn’t want to burn myself out since we still want to go see the Vietnam Wall and the White House. When I slowly climbed the stairs to the Lincoln monument and reached the top it was just gorgeous to see! It was remarkable to see how big it is and seeing it on T.V is just not the same. The Lincoln memorial was my favorite memorial to see by far. Once we were done looking at it and reading all the stuff from Lincoln we sat on top of the steps and people watched. I just could not get over how many foreigners where there looking at our American History. The sad part that there were not very many Americans there looking at our history. I had to rest for little bit before we started to walk down all the steps.

 

The next memorial we looked at was the Vietnam wall that was very humbling to see. Just seeing all the names and all the flowers and gifts people leave there at the wall. After that we caught a cab to head over to the White house since I was getting worn down. It was kind of crazy getting out of the cab and having to walk to get close to the White House. Since you can longer drive on the street in front of the white house and the back of the white house. The have barricades up so you can’t even get close to the fence that surrounds the house. The secret Service guys are very on point and can be a little rude and kind of jumpy with people. We simply just walked all around the White house then I had to take a rest on the Southside of the lawn. So we could walk even more to get back to the train station and head back to Old Town. When we arrived back to Old Town we ate at a great Oyster bar called Hank’s Oyster’s I highly recommend checking it out if you are ever in that area. By time dinner was over we were wiped out and ready for bed since we had a 45-minute drive to Johns Hopkins in the morning and I needed to be there at 9:30 a.m.

 

Friday morning bright and early with a Starbucks in my hand we headed off to Baltimore to John Hopkins to see Dr. Levy. Eric was worried that traffic would be very bad and would take awhile to get there. We made good timing arriving at 9:00a.m. I have always enjoyed Dr.Levy I have seen and listen to him speak at Guthy Jackson Patient Day for seven years. I have always wanted to fly out and go see him and I was thrilled I got that opportunity, Dr. Levy and I spent a over an hour going through my NMO history and what issues I would like to address. He would like to switch some medications around and do some blood tests and follow up in a few weeks. Since I have been diagnosed for 8 years there was a lot of information that needs to be talked about. Plus he wants to look at my MRI’s when I was first diagnosed to my latest MRI’S to see how my lesions are doing.

 

After leaving the Hospital we drove around Baltimore a little bit then we went to a crab place that had really good reviews for crab. Eric wanted crabs right out of the bucket. Like when he lived in Virginia Beach. So that was a nice lunch. We decided to take a scenic route back to D.C I wanted to check out Georgetown. LOL it seemed like a good idea but it kind of a pain but we made it to Georgetown the next tricky part was finding parking. It took us awhile but Eric got it done. I wanted to go shopping and stop at my favorite cupcake store Sprinkles! If anyone really knows me I am very addictive to these cupcakes. If I am visiting a city and they have Sprinkle store I will be most defiantly will be stopping by and buying cupcakes. After shopping for a while we headed back to the hotel and rested for a bit and went to a late dinner at a fabulous Southern food restaurant called Hen’s Quarters. It was the best-fried chicken I have had in a long time. We took a nice stroll down King Street after dinner and headed back to hotel cause we were pretty beat.

 

Saturday was a very special day we decided to spend the day at Arlington Cemetery. I wanted to see the tomb of the unknown solider and the changing of the guard. But also were the Kennedy’s are buried. Also I wanted to spend our last day at a place that was not going to be too crowded with people and was going to be not so noisy and just spend a quite day getting ready to go back to reality. I loved watching the changing of the guard and over all seeing the cemetery and seeing where JFK is buried. We spent about 4 hours walking around the cemetery. We headed back to hotel around 3 and went to a local bar and had a few drinks and went shopping a little bit then off to Hank Oyster Bar again because they had the best crab cake we found during our vacation. We enjoyed our last romantic dinner. Since we had an early flight on Sunday Morning.

Now that I am back home I am still waiting to hear back about the blood tests and on Friday I have an Appointment with my neurologist about what Dr.Levy said and the new medications I Need to try. So I will keep you all posted!

http://hanksoysterbar.com

http://www.henquarter.com

https://sprinkles.com

 

img_7027 img_6980 img_6929 img_6910 img_6893 img_6862img_0152 img_6848img_6859 img_6844 img_6831 img_6828 img_6817img_6787  img_6765 img_6764 erin-at-lincoln-monument erin-at-washington-monument

 

 

 

 

 

Recap of my recent trip to Canada

Christine Ha and Carl Heinrich, hosts of Four Senses on AMI

Processed with VSCOWith my co-host, Carl Heinrich, owner of Richmond Station in Toronto and season 2 winner of Top Chef Canada

I was in Canada the second half of September filming the fourth season of my accessible cooking show, Four Senses. TV is much less glamorous than one would think: I get picked up around 6:45 AM every morning. We film two episodes a day, which has me on my feet for most of it, while trying to be energetic, making conversation with our guests, cooking, and then throwing scripted lines to camera. Because I’m vision impaired, I have to memorize my throws and try to find the camera with my eyes at the same time. This was what I did for seven days straight, as we filmed our entire 13-episode season in 7 days. Then after we wrap each day, I have a meeting with our director, producer, and my co-host to go over the next day’s scripts. Then I grab a quick bite and then study the next day’s scripts and guest bios until I finally get to bed around 11 or midnight. Then I wake up before sunrise and do it all over again.

All that said, being part of the industry has given me a new appreciation for the efforts that go into making a TV show. production is definitely labor intensive, and it takes a strong, hardworking team with everyone doing their job to pull it off. A production is only as strong as its weakest link. This season, our team consisted of 23 cast and crew.

What I like about television is the challenges it’s posed. TV really forced me out of my comfort zone—I’m an introvert and not naturally great on camera—and it’s gratifying to work hard together and know we’re doing something that helps others. In our case, it’s making educational entertainment that challenges those who are vision impaired to regain independence by returning to the kitchen.

I had a few days off in between my field shoots and studio run, so I got to see Jenna, her husband Mike, and their daughter Sophie. It was a rainy day, but we managed to grab lunch and some drinks at Mill St. Brewing before I attempted to hit hockey pucks in the downpour. (It was the hockey World Cup, and Toronto’s Distillery District had been transformed into a cocky village complete with carnival stations..)

The rest of our afternoon was spent traversing the mall downtown. My hubs, John, bought a Blue Jays hat, and Jenna and I combed Aritzia while our men discussed with disbelief about how long women can take in a single store.

As always, Jenna and I talked about the goings-on in our lives, how we’re doing with the Neuromyelitis Optica/NMO, and then made sarcastic remarks about everything else. It’s nice to hang out with people who get our illness but whom don’t make it the center of conversation. We may have NMO, but NMO doesn’t always need to have us.

Overall, I had a good experience in Canada (with the exception of some piss-pour service from Air Canada, but I’ll save that for another time). I’ll end this recap with a few notable observations which, I hope, you’ll find amusing more than anything.

What I learned about Canada, Canadians, and Toronto in 2016

  1. Bears are a common sighting during the fall season. Apparently they’re searching for food to fatten themselves up before winter hibernation.
  2. People who live in Toronto are called Torontonians. Despite what I, a Houstonian, might have thought, Torontonians do not eat poutin every day. In fact, they only ingest it late at night after many drinks.
  3. Torontonians really love their Blue Jays. Unfortunately, I was told Toronto now holds the record for North American city with the longest streak without any sports championships. (The former record holder was Cleveland, but the Cavaliers had changed that.)
  4. Three Canadian snacks you should try are ketchup chips, all dressed chips, and coffee crisps.
  5. Many Canadians are wary of Texans. (Believe me when I say not all Texans open-carry guns and support Trump.)
  6. Whenever they find out I’m American, almost every Canadian without fail brings up Trump. Please know I’d much rather talk about Netflix shows, dogs, and poutin.
  7. September is a great time to be in Toronto because the weather is amazing. Get your breezy, sunny days now before the harsh winter sets in.
  8. Toronto has great food. You can get fine dining, French, Caribbean, Japanese, Chinese, Spanish, and American all within a few city blocks.

Till next time, Canada…xoxo!

P.S. Here’s an interview I did with CBC Toronto’s Dwight Drummond about Four Senses.

Four Senses season 4 cast and crew

It takes a village to make a TV show.

City Exploring: Los Angeles and San Francisco

I find peace in my life by being present in every moment and working towards a better mindful meditation practice. That’s how I thoroughly enjoyed my summer vacation.

This year my family and I travelled to Los Angeles with a stop over in San Francisco before returning home to Toronto. Not one to want to waste a moment (and to constantly entertain a 4 year old) I jam packed our schedule in an attempt to see as much as possible.

We started with 2 nights in Anaheim at Disneyland. A smaller property than Disney World in Florida, there a lot of the same rides. My body fatigue has really affected me lately but with good planning (so you’re not running from one side of the park to the other), and a nap midday, it’s possible to see the best parts including the night time parade and fireworks.

disneydisney2

We headed into Los Angeles and visited their farmers market, The Grove, and the pedestrian shopping district. I thought it might also be fun to rent a powerboat and cruise the coastline. After an hour of choppy water (yup, we were sea sick) we opted to stay inland and enjoy some marina cruising. We visited the beaches including Venice Beach with their famous Muscle Beach attraction. I admittedly felt unsafe there because as a tourist trap every street performer, vendor and homeless person wanted our money, and asked in an aggressive manner. And we took in the natural phenomenon of the La Brea Tar Pits, which is as it sounds; natural tar that has risen to the surface and trapped fossils dating back hundreds of years.

boat

We finished our trip in LA at the Santa Monica Pier. On a bright, sunny day we peacefully strolled through the park, just enjoying each other’s company and being grateful for moments like those. I will say that the pier is not a smooth walk. With our small travel stroller, Sophie complained the ride was bumpy and the wheels occasionally got stuck in a ridge or groove. I might not recommend the entire pier to those in a wheelchair. You can still enjoy the view from the adjacent park.

pierpier2

I booked San Francisco thinking I’d love to explore the city but hadn’t done my homework to know it’s quite an expensive city. Accommodations, even modest ones, can run several hundred per night. Don’t think about renting a car and parking; Even with Uber from one destination to another it is much cheaper. San Francisco has their famous Fisherman’s Wharf. A real fan of seafood and meats (protein is your friend when on a Paleo diet) I ate the largest crab in my life, cooked before me on the pier. We also spent a day visiting the Alcatraz Prison Island. I hate audio tours but this was fantastic. Wheelchair accessible with elevators on the island and the ferries, it is a sight for all to enjoy. There is a bit of walking but take breaks because you can leave on any ferry when you’re ready. Be warned about the city in general though – it’s much colder then you’d imagine and the streets are so steep cars ride their brakes often.

fishermanalcatraz

I’ve always thought of myself as a beach bum or an adventure seeker but never as a city explorer until this trip. If you decide the west coast is somewhere you might want to visit, both cities and their people have so much to offer.

(more…)

My cooking show, Four Senses, is returning for a fourth season

Christine & Carl Four Senses 2 (Varner Productions Limited)

My co-host, Top Chef season 2 winner Carl Heinrich, and me in front of our Le Creuset adorned set

Next week, I’ll fly to Toronto, Canada, to begin production of season 4 of Four Senses, a cooking show geared towards the vision impaired and novice cook. The show airs on Accessible Media, Inc or AMI, but even if you aren’t Canadian and don’t get this channel, you can catch the show on AMI’s website, complete with a fully accessible media player.

If you asked me a couple of years ago if I’d ever thought I’d have a cooking show going for four seasons, I would’ve shrugged and said, “Who knows?” If you would’ve asked me five years ago if I thought I’d ever be on TV, I would’ve laughed in your face. It goes to show you just never know with life—both good and bad things happen to us during the course of our lifetimes, and all we can do is make the most of them.

Every season has gotten better and better, and I attribute it to more support; growing funding; and, perhaps most of all, a stronger and more experienced team of cast and crew. I think you’ll be able to tell the difference in caliber if you watch our first season versus our third and most recent.

I’m looking forward to yet another season. People often don’t realize how much hard work goes into producing a television series—one 30-minute episode takes at least four hours of filming (and that’s not including the out-of-studio field pieces we shoot on a different day, plus the hours of post-production editing). Being in the entertainment industry is not as glamorous as one may think, but I love what I do—it’s the best feeling to wrap a shoot and know that all the hard work everyone put in together will result in something great. It’s an exemplary example of how teamwork is essential to success.

I won’t get too much time off—we shoot our in-studio portions of the season seven days straight (which is how most television production schedules go)—but when I do have a little downtime, I’ll be vlogging and visiting with Jenna.

Canada, here I come!

06
Sep 2016
POSTED BY Christine
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How to live with NMO and still enjoy your vacation

Christine with family in Vietnam

Family vacation in Vung Tau, Vietnam

We’re deep into the summer season, and that means summer vacations. I just got back from a month-long stint in Vietnam—a half-vacation, half-business trip—and while it feels spectacular to be home, travel is what I live for.

Travel opens your mind. It keeps you grounded. It makes you realize you are just a small speck in this universe, and that there is not necessarily a right or wrong, good or bad way to do things. This is why I travel and why, when I’m asked, “How can I learn to be a better cook?,” I say, travel.

Of course, I also have Neuromyelitis Optica/NMO, and traveling, even for a healthy person, can be stressful on the mind and body. Before I step foot out the door, I must plan, plan, plan. Here is a practical checklist to ensure you have a great vacation in spite of NMO.

1. Pack your meds, both those you regularly require and those you may need for acute situations.

I always carry my trusty meds on me. In a little container I purchased from The Container Store, I stuff:


  • Prescription meds in case I experience symptomatic neuropathic pain
  • Over-the-counter meds like ibuprofen in case of aches or general pains,?li>
  • Vitamins that I take daily
  • OTC sleep aids of which I sometimes take half when trying to adjust to a new time zone

Sometimes I will pack a prescription course of corticosteroids (e.g. Dexamethasone) in case I experience a NMO flare-up while traveling; of course, you should consult with your neurologist first to see if this is a viable option for you.

The above is my personal rundown of meds I pack but, just as every patient’s NMO is different, your list of meds will also differ.

2. Bring your insurance card and any other information you may need in case of an emergency.

We all know NMO can be unpredictable. An attack can be triggered by stress, fatigue, allergic reactions to foreign foods—all things we encounter during travel. Sometimes, an attack can happen without a detectable reason. You never know when you might end up in the emergency room in another city or country, so make sure you bring along with you any information you might need should you find yourself in this unfortunate situation: your health insurance cards and information about NMO for the clinic staff (since it’s still unheard of by many), which you can obtain from the Guthy Jackson Foundation.

3. Wear and pack comfortable, breathable clothes and shoes.

Comfort is key when on vacation. My so-called “en route uniform” usually consists of a UNIQLO Airism top, black GapFit sweatpants, sneakers, and a lightweight cardigan. If I’m traveling for work and have to look halfway decent upon arrival, I’ll wear a tee-shirt dress, leggings, and slip-on Chelsea boots or flats. The essentials are always breathable, wrinkle-free apparel in which you can move freely, an unrestrictive waistline, and shoes that you can easily remove at airport security checkpoint. Layering is important )hence the short-sleeved tops accompanied by a thin cardigan) because you’ll more often than not find yourself going from mild climate to freezing temperatures aboard an airplane to makeup-melting temperatures at your tropical summer destination.

And if you do book a vacation to somewhere hot, consider bringing this cooling tel—just wet, shake, and place on the back of your neck to cool your body down.

Being in a new environment and getting there and back are stressful enough—minimize the stress by donning comfortable clothing.

4. Use your cane or request a wheelchair as needed.

Request a wheelchair to help you navigate the airport to preserve energy. This can be done as soon as you get dropped off at the airport curb—just flag down an airport employee and say you need wheelchair assistance to the gate.

You should be able to go through the special TSA security line reserved for the elderly, disabled, or those traveling with small children. Then when you get to your gate, tell the gate attendant you’ll needto pre-board. (Or if you have a cane or are seated in the wheelchair, they should automatically pre-board you.)

Navigating an airport is stressful enough, so take advantage of these services designed to alleviate travel fatigue.

5. Allow ample time for rest between activities.

Lastly, once you’ve reached your destination, make sure it’s truly a vacation. Avoid packing your schedule so tightly that you fail to relax and enjoy, which are the points of a vacation. Slow down so you don’t miss the unexpected, serendipitous discoveries of a new place.

I made this mistake when I backpacked through western Europe the summer after I graduated college. Of course, I was a lot younger then (and thus had the energy to run from museum to internet cafe to landmark to train station). But I remember being in Florence towards the tail end of my trip, and after seeing Michelangelo’s statue of David masterpiece, I just shrugged and thought to myself, “This is the umpteenth museum I’ve visited in Europe—they’re getting to be all the same.”

I regret letting that complacency settle in, and since then, I knew better than to overpack a vacation schedule. Now I allow myself more time for leisure and rest. After all, I can’t enjoy exploring when I’m exhausted. It’s nice to be able to go back to a “home base” (I.e. Hotel or airbnb) to get in a little R&R before hitting the streets again in search of the next site or restaurant.

So there you have it: my personal 5 tips for an enjoyable vacation in spite of NMO. Who said you can’t have fun, travel, and experience new things with NMO? Tell your NMO to buzz off—you’re on vacation!

01
Aug 2016
POSTED BY Christine
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Teaching blind and low vision students how to cook

**This entry was originally published on Christine’s blog.

Last April, I was invited to teach a cooking workshop at the W Ross MacDonald School in Brantford, Ontario, Canada. A little background on WRMS: founded in 1872, the school teaches blind and blind-deaf students from grades K through 12. There are currently around 200 enrolled students.

With a grant received from the Ministry of Education in Ontario, WRMS created a Healthier Eating Program with the purpose of teaching students the importance of health and nutrition. As part of the program, I was asked to lead a one-day workshop and teach some of the cooking students how to independently prepare a nutritious meal. Many of the students were going to graduate and begin university soon, so as in the spirit of education, there was an emphasis on fostering independent thought and action.

So what should we cook together as a class?

There’s a careful process for curating a menu, whether it be for a fancy gala, an intimate dinner, a festive party, or (in this case) a student workshop. You have to consider your audience; understand the event; and know what’s available in terms of ingredients, equipment, and abilities of the cooks. For this workshop, my audience was high school students with no or limited vision. Soon they will be living on modest college students’ income, so the ingredients and equipment required couldn’t be expensive. I wanted the recipes to be easy so as to not intimidate, yet delicious enough for them to enjoy and want to revisit in their own kitchens. I also needed to encompass the different food groups to provide an array of nutrition. In considering all of these parameters, I decided to teach them how to make Peruvian-style baked chicken with green chile sauce, roasted vegetables, and rice pudding with orange zest for dessert.

Here’s a little known fact about me: I love chicken on the bone. I love gnawing all the meat and cartilage off chicken. The hubs makes fun of me because in the time I take to eat one chicken wing, he’s eaten four. My favorite part of the chicken are the leg quarters, because dark meat is juicy and delicious. It also is more forgiving during cooking, which means it’s harder to overcook. I requested the students cook with chicken leg quarters, but their teacher informed me she’s had trouble getting them to eat unfamiliar things like beans (yes, beans!), so bone-in meat may not go over well with the kids.

“They may get squeamish about it,” she said.

What???

After I thought about it, I decided to refuse the substitution for boneless, skinless chicken thighs. I explained that people need to know where their food comes from: that meat comes from animals that were once living and not from a rectangular styrofoam container at the supermarket.

I said, “I want the students to respect their food.”

The teacher agreed and said hopefully since the “words of wisdom” would be coming from me and not her, maybe they’ll listen.

On the day of the workshop, I actually didn’t get any squeamish vibes from the students when they had to touch the raw bone-in chicken legs. I told them why it’s best to use whole chicken or at least chicken parts most intact and closest to resembling a whole chicken. Since it wasn’t a butchering class (and honestly, I’m not the greatest butcher), we settled on chicken leg quarters.

After the food finished, we all sat down to eat, and everyone enjoyed the mealtime together.

“Best of all,” I said, “you cooked it yourselves!”

The teacher and some of the students were so touched by my inspiring presence, that when they told me how much my time there meant to them, I felt in turn incredibly blessed. It’s always nice to be reminded why I’ve been given the position to advocate for the blind.

This experience of teaching the students at W Ross MacDonald School convinced me I want to open a cooking school one day for both children and adults. Maybe
That’ll be my mission after opening a restaurant and publishing my memoir. I never thought of myself as a teacher, but since my philosophy is to always try new things in life, perhaps opening a cooking school is in my destiny.

21
Jun 2016
POSTED BY Christine
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Patient Day 2016

Guthy Jackson NMO Patient day is always a special day for me. It’s the one-day a year I get to connect with my NMO family. This year marked my 5th time attending this special day, this year I brought my mom. I wanted her to meet my NMO family and some of the doctors that I have talked with. Every year at Patient day Ms. Jackson does a fabulous job putting on this event for patients. It is such a great opportunity for patients to connect with each other and talk to some of the top NMO doctors. It is so nice to talk to another person that has NMO and talk about what you are feeling and they completely understand. This event is so special Ms. Jackson has doctors all over the world to come talk to us patients about whatever questions we might have. Also patients get to find out what’s happening new in the medical world of NMO.

The big topic this year was researchers talking to us patients about trying medical trials for new drugs for NMO. It was very interesting and there were some good points made about this topic. If you are interested to learn more about the clinical trials please visit the Guthy Jackson website there are some great resources there. The also had several breakout sessions this year from asking the Docs, nutrition, mediation, navigating insurance, managing pain and simplifying the science of NMO. It is a day where you can learn as much as you can about having NMO or being a caregiver for a NMO patient.

The other big thing is donating the blood to the Circles program that hopefully helps a cure for NMO. I strongly encourage you to do this if you are a NMO patient and your family. We all have a piece in this very large puzzle and we need to work together to help find the cure.

When the conference is all over with the patients gather around and have dinner and just talk to each other and have a good time. We are all like one big family and we really enjoy spending time with each other and like I said this is a one-day thing we get to bond like this. Its hard to say goodbye at the end of the night to each other. But we know in 364 more days we will be reunited together again.

http://guthyjacksonfoundation.org

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Snowboarding in Whistler

We’ve just returned from what has now become our annual ski trip to Whistler, British Columbia and it was, wait for it…awesome! After years of on again off again learning I finally feel confident enough to call myself a snowboarder. Making such a bold statement is a big deal because for once I’m actually proud of myself.

I’m a snowboarder with NMO.

Neuromyelitis optica has robbed me of so much but it hasn’t taken away my spirit for adventure. Finally comfortable enough to complete blue runs in Whistler, I rarely fell on the mountains. Swooshing down at a max speed of 42 km/hr (there’s an app for that) I completed several hours each day, for 5 straight days in a row.

In your face NMO!

I will confess though; this was the most I’ve pushed myself physically since my major attacks. And yes, it hurt, a lot. On every run my back screamed in pain and my legs tingled till they went numb. I knew it was time to take a break when my body wouldn’t complete anymore turns. It usually resulted in a fall from exhaustion/pain. So why do it? Because the sense of accomplishment and adrenaline is my new drug. It easily outweighs any amount of pain or fear of heights. The ongoing pep talk in my head is an exercise in will power. It is how I have always planned to live with NMO.

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Me boarding one of the back bowls on what was quite a foggy day. The run is called “Burnt Stew Trail”.

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Me, stuck in powder snow. I am laughing hysterically because it was like falling into a cloud.

 

Now, I’ll never be an Olympic snowboarder, but my kid might be.

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Sophie, 3 years old. Having completed a week of ski school.

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Family photo, Whistler, British Columbia, 2016.