NMO and Pregnancy – A Patient’s Perspective

Both Erin and I have had successful pregnancies so we’re often asked how exactly we’ve done it. Truth is, no one really knows how we got so lucky (as we all know NMO is so unpredictable) but we did work with a great team of doctors, understood what we were getting into and built a plan that we think helped us stay on track.

Here’s our disclaimer: we are not doctors or ever think our opinion is superior. Pregnancy and NMO is not for everyone. This documentation is meant to provide insight into our journey and what we learned along the way. It’s meant as an external resource for those with Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO) who are considering pregnancy.

Q: I have NMO. Can I get pregnant?
A: Maybe. The reality is that there just aren’t enough documented cases of patients with NMO and pregnancy. There have been some successful cases, like ours and there have been some unsuccessful cases that have resulted in miscarriages and major NMO attacks.

Q: When is the best time for us to try getting pregnant?
A: Ideally you want as much time between your last attack and when you become pregnant. The longer time you provide your body with stability, the better. Our doctors recommended we wait several years before we even started the conversation about pregnancy. This is a conversation that should include your entire team of health care providers.

Q: I’m on a lot of medications. Are they safe for a pregnancy?
A: All immune suppressant medication, including Cellcept, Rituximab, and Imuran are classified as unsafe for pregnancy. Logically speaking, these drugs are meant to slow down an immune system, which doesn’t make sense for an unborn child who is developing an immune system inside you. There are several programs often affiliated with your local hospital that will help you determine which drugs are safer than others for use during a pregnancy, but remember, no drug is 100% safe during a pregnancy.

Q: But if I come off my medication won’t I suffer from another major attack?
A: Possibly. Ideally you want to wean off all unsafe medication (like immune suppressant drugs) and ramp up a suitable substitute (like prednisone) to provide you with some protection while you are pregnant. Only you can determine if you’re willing to take this risk with your body.

Q: Can I still try to get pregnant the good old fashion way?
A: You could but ideally you want to minimize the amount of time you are without the best treatment to protect you from another NMO attack. That’s why both of us decided to pursue in-vitro fertilization (IVF). That way we were able to time exactly when the unacceptable drugs were out of our system with a close date to when we would ideally be pregnant. Talk to your doctors to see if IVF is an option for you.

Q: What happens if I have an attack during my pregnancy?
A: This is something you’ll need to discuss as part of your plan and is very personal to you and your family. You’ll want to discuss your wishes with your team of doctors beforehand so everyone knows what you want should you experience an NMO attack during your pregnancy.

Q: Who should follow me medically while I am pregnant?
A: You’ll want to continue working with your existing medical team as they’ll be familiar with your history but you’ll also want to consider a high-risk obstetrician as some medication, like prednisone, can create additional problems like gestational diabetes, during your pregnancy.

Q: I’m worried about the delivery. Are there special considerations for patients with NMO?
A: It will depend on your wishes and what recommendations your team of doctors will make. Typically, if you’ve had a transverse myelitis (TM) attack you may want to consider a c-section to eliminate any extra pressure on your spine during delivery. Make sure you meet with your anesthesiologist beforehand to identify where the problem areas exist on your spine should you need or choose to get an epidural.

Q: My doctor wants me on my medication right after delivery but I really want to breastfeed. Can it be done?
A: It will depend how your pregnancy goes. If things go well you might have the option to delay your previous course of medication long enough to breastfeed for a period of time. Voice this desire with your doctors to build it into your plan. If you suffer from extreme symptoms or worse, an attack, during your pregnancy you’ll likely want to pursue the best treatment plan available as soon as possible so you can make sure you’re there for your new addition to your family. From our perspective we both chose to breastfeed for as long as it was safely recommended by our doctors – aside from all the regular benefits of breastfeeding, it also helped prolong the feeling of pregnancy for our bodies and allowed for a slower transition from pregnant to not pregnant, providing the opportunity to adjust.

Q: I’m worried I’ll gain a lot of weight during my pregnancy and will struggle to lose it once I start my treatment plan post-pregnancy. 
A: Like all new moms weight loss post pregnancy is a challenge. Build it into your plan to work with a nutritionist and set realistic goals knowing that movement isn’t always the easiest for NMO patients.

Q: Having NMO is already an emotional roller coaster. Can I handle a pregnancy?
A: Only you can answer that. Don’t get pressured into a pregnancy if you aren’t sure you can emotionally handle the unknowns and/or if you do not think your body can handle such physical changes. Be sure to have a positive support system available during the planning process, your pregnancy and available to assist post pregnancy. Be sure you talk through and agree on a plan for worse case scenarios.

20
Apr 2015
POSTED BY Jenna
DISCUSSION 1 Comment

An intimate interview with Nancy Reimer, NMO Advocate

This week we’d like to showcase another “Mom on a Mission” Nancy Reimer, who is the mastermind behind the very first dedicated NMO (neuromyelitis optica) Walk/Run. It’s difficult not to cry reading her candid response to our very intimate questions. Always honest, sincere and tough, Nancy took time to respond to our questions from her home in British Columbia, Canada.

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1. What motivated you to start the first NMO dedicated walk/run?

I think if I am being completely honest, my motivation for starting the first NMO dedicated Walk/Run was anger and grief. We all have our own ways of dealing with the tough stuff in life and for me I felt like if I did not find a positive outlet for my feelings of anger and grief surrounding Riley’s diagnosis, that I would likely go under and not resurface. It was excruciating as a Mom to go through that first year and to not have a diagnosis really until his fourth relapse. To hear the words “no cure” almost did me in, however, it was around that time that the idea to have an event specific to NMO entered my mind. Organizing this event gave me a positive focus…something that I could do in my own community to raise awareness and funding specifically for Neuromyelitis Optica. When I started planning the event, I was surprised that there were others with the diagnosis who immediately reached out to me. It then became something that extended out much further than Riley’s diagnosis.

2. Were you always planning to make it an annual event?

I remember the final weeks leading up to the first ever event thinking, “what if nobody comes”. Silly really, because so many had registered…we ended up with around 400 that first year. I think my thought process was to just see how year one went…then year two…and now we are leading up to year three! Never in my wildest dreams did I imagine that it would ever go beyond year one. It has become this incredible place of support for those who live with NMO and their families. This event has given us all something that we “CAN” do to make a difference. We cannot change the diagnosis, but we can rally together with our supporters and be there for each other while we educate our communities about NMO.

3. What improvements to the event are you planning for this year?

Each year I look at what worked and what did not. I have to say that both years so far have been pretty darn amazing. Last year we added a few more sponsors, a KidZone and onsite yoga classes. We were also delighted to have a local dance school come and do a flash mob at our event. The onsite Sponsors are incredible and most have been with us since year one. When looking for Sponsors, you are asking people/businesses in the community to believe in both the cause and that your event will succeed. You never know what kind of support exists unless you are willing to ask. So for this year, we have all of our amazing Sponsors coming back, some fantastic post-race entertainment and snacks…don’t forget the snacks!!!!

4. Fundraising certainly has its challenges. What advice would you give to those who do so yearly? How do you keep it relevant and fresh?

Fundraising has been a challenge. I struggled a lot with this aspect of the event last year. Our registration fees are part of our fundraising efforts and that is the easy part, but asking for donations above and beyond has, in the past, been a challenge. When you are asking people or businesses to donate, I have found that most need to have that personal connection to the cause for them to fully be able to identify with it. Unfortunately, many do not identify with Neuromyelitis Optica. Some are willing to listen, while others are not. I have learned to give a brief synopsis of the disease and leave a letter with more details and unfortunately, unless they take the time to read the letter or our personal story, I rarely hear back. That was tough for a few of us last year but then as we started to really look at the event, it occurred to us that maybe that’s not what this event is about. Yes, it is so amazing to be able to contribute financially to the cause and ultimately the cure, but maybe our event serves a different purpose. There is nothing that has been so healing to me as standing before that “sea of green” and seeing that visual support all at once. It is several communities standing together, unified in their support of a cause…our cause. There is not a price tag for that…the support onsite on event day is priceless!!!! To me, if I can provide that for the people who have this diagnosis, then I have done my job well.

5. Riley is another year older so he’s another year wiser. How do you feel this event impacts him on a personal level?

This is a tough one. Riley does not often verbalize what he feels about his diagnosis or about the event. He was only 7 when NMO entered his world and I think for him the event has just become a part of that. Perhaps as he gets older, he will realize more, like I have, the magnitude of the support that stands before him and that this event came to be because he was diagnosed with Neuromyelitis Optica. It was created based on his personal diagnosis. For Riley, life has really normalized in the past couple years. The beginning of May marks 3 years of stability for him. That is huge. I remember the panic of that first year and I wondered if this disease would ever give him a break or if it would be a lifetime of relapses, hospitals and rehab centres. I remember the severity of some of his relapses and wondered if he would live, if he would move, if he would walk again, if he would be able to see…we’ve come a long way baby!!! I am beyond grateful for his stability and he is very blessed to have an amazing team of Doctors that have made it their priority to keep him that way.

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6. To quote the Guthy-Jackson Foundation, you’re another “Mom on a mission”. How do you stay inspired and motivated?

My motivation wakes up in the room across the hall from me every morning. I walk in to see the mop of curls on his pillow. My heart still skips a beat when he does not respond right away. I have learned over the past few years, what it means to be a “Mom on a Mission”. Simply put, a Mom on a Mission is a woman driven by something that puts her child/children in danger, and will fight to the ends of the earth to change that for her child/children. I have had that feisty attitude my whole life and I am learning now to channel it into something good. Both of my children know, without a doubt, that I will always fight for them and will bulldoze anything, Neuromyelitis Optica included, that puts them in danger. The last couple of years have been hard for me. Once I got through that initial flurry of the first year full of attacks, diagnosis and then, finally, stability, I saw the damage…the backlash of the ordeal. The thing is, when you are fighting for a child, your child, you do not feel the plummet to the bottom of the totem pole. I was not a priority and have suffered more than most know, as I have become quite good at just carrying on with life. A car accident in the midst of all of this, just added to that by introducing chronic pain into my body. This year so far has been about healing me. I am, as best as I can, making myself and my own health and recovery, a priority. I still have moments where I plummet, but I never camp there for very long. I have a job to do and in order to do that; I need to be the strongest, healthiest version of me. My motivation now reaches around the globe. My fight is no longer just about my child anymore. It is about every person, anywhere, who has received diagnosis the of Neuromyelitis Optica. We are this amazing family and I honestly do not know how I have lived my life up to this point without these incredible people in my life. I am inspired and motivated daily by the people who were brought into my life through this diagnosis. I am so very proud to be a part of a rare disease family that together will find a cure for Neuromyelitis Optica…I truly believe that!!!!

7. Tell us how people can get involved and all the details of this year’s event.

7. You can get involved in our event by being there if you are able to do so. For those who cannot be physically there, we added a Virtual Participant option to our registration, last year, which allows anyone…anywhere in the world, to register for $10 and support our event and the cause. To symbolize that support, I write all of the virtual participant’s names on my shirt and wear it to the event so it is as if you are there. My goal this year would be to have a really full shirt of names. Our event supports two charities… The UBC NMO Clinic and Research Program and the Guthy-Jackson Charitable Foundation. Donation links to both are available on our family website along with the link to register for our event.
You can visit our website to register, make a donation or view our videos, photos and press from years 1 and 2 of our NMO Walk/Run. nomorenmo.com

Video

Snowboarding with NMO

A couple weeks ago my family took our annual trip to Whistler, British Columbia. Even though my husband was the one to fall in love with the city before me, I’ve come to really look forward to the fresh air and now, even the snowboarding. Let me take a few steps back…

When I first took up snowboarding it was on a whim, or rather a misinterpretation from my therapist. I was in my mid 20s, divorced, I moved to a whole new city leaving my friends and family and even declined a promotion to chase something I couldn’t quite explain to myself. I knew I needed help figuring out what I was going through so I found a therapist I really liked and we used talk therapy vs. medication. She recommended that I find something to commit to and stick with it. My husband (boyfriend at the time) wanted me to try snowboarding so on a whim I marched into a sports store, spent a ridiculous amount of money on all the gear and headed for the bunny hill thinking snowboarding would be the thing I could commit to. I like the outdoors, I’ve always been somewhat athletic and I’m a bit of a thrill seeker. What a mistake that was! Despite the beat up tailbone and bruises to my body and ego, I kept going. Then NMO happened.

When they tell you that you’ll likely never walk again or at least really struggle you either accept it or you make the decision to prove them wrong. I made the decision to walk in high heels again and still keep trying to snowboard no matter what. Even though I’d still qualify myself as a beginner because I just don’t have enough time to really practice, I’m still committed. Here I am, still toughing it out on the mountains.

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I’m scared of heights and it hurts like hell. I mean, it really hurts, but this matters to me. Truth be told after the first minute my spine feels like it’s being ripped out from my neck and the pain gets worse throughout the day. And my legs, those useless pieces of garbage…ugh. So I get nervous and pep talk myself on gondolas, chair lifts and when I’m strapping on my board. I’m sure I seem crazy to everyone around me and I usually don’t disagree. But the ability to face my fears – of heights, of commitment, and of one day never walking again – when I get to the bottom of that mountain, that’s euphoria.

They say with snowboarding that one day it just clicks. I felt like this year it kinda did for me and right from the get go I was able to put together turns and do my dreaded toe turns without panicking and choosing to bail out. I’m wondering if with life that one day it just clicks for me too.

Here’s a sample of my scared rambling (you’ve been warned) just before I head down a new run. And another video showcasing my (lack of) talent.

http://youtu.be/pnLBWV6rFF8

18
Mar 2015
POSTED BY Jenna
DISCUSSION No Comments
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LA NMO Patient Day 2015

Arriving in LA, March 3rd, 2015.

Arriving in LA, March 3rd, 2015.

So I’ve just returned from my first NMO Patient Day in Los Angeles. I am still processing the experience- I think it will take a few weeks for everything to sink in. I was mulling over which parts I wanted to share with you because obviously, there’s alot that goes on at an event like this. I think I will go with the things that stuck out for me.

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GJF founder Victoria Jackson welcoming everyone to NMO Patient Day.

First of all, the Guthy-Jackson Charitable Foundation was only founded six and a half years ago. At that time, there were NO clinical trials for NMO. There are now THREE being set in motion which is absolutely incredible! At Patient Day, we had the opportunity to hear from representatives from each of the three drug companies, Alexion, Chugai and MedImmune that are running the clinical trials. They did a great job explaining in layman’s terms how each of their trials worked. It was good to hear the facts and to be able to ask questions. Because NMO is so rare, we are being encouraged to participate in the clinical trials if we meet the eligibility criteria. This is our opportunity to actively help find the cure for NMO.  More information about these studies can be found here at NMOtion: http://nmotion.guthyjacksonfoundation.org/

The second thing that I noticed at Patient Day was the sense of community. It was heartwarming to see everyone looking out for everyone else in our time together. As a first time participant travelling solo to LA, I especially appreciated how everyone was welcoming and inclusive. The GJF staff were especially kind. The day after the conference, some participants had their flights cancelled due to inclement weather at their home destinations. I saw a post on the Facebook group saying that someone who was staying an extra day had a spare bed in her room if anyone was stranded and needed accommodation for the night. It’s that kind of generousity of spirit which really impressed me.

 

I had the chance to share some of the ways in which I advocate for NMO awareness through the UBC Interprofessional Health Mentors Program and as a Community Representative for the MS Society of Canada. While I wasn’t at my best, (I sustained a fractured rib the week before and was still in a considerable amount of pain) it was really nice to have people come up to me afterwards and offer such positive feedback about the work I am doing. I really appreciated the support. I always feel so blessed to be able to serve and do the work I am most passionate about.

Manhattan Beach, LA

Manhattan Beach, LA

I also had the opportunity the day before and the day after to do a little sightseeing. On Tuesday I took a shuttle bus to Manhattan Beach, which was beautiful. White sands as far as the eye can see. Apparently when Waikiki, Hawaii was establishing itself as a tourist destination in the 1920’s and 30’s, they actually-get this-imported the white sands from Manhattan Beach to transform their rocky beaches! I had a great time wandering the little seaside village and just because I could, I had ice cream for lunch.

Selfie on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Selfie on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Thursday, I took the hotel shuttle to the airport and caught a shuttle bus to Hollywood to see the Walk of Fame. I had a good time wandering Hollywood Blvd. and seeing so many familiar names. I talked to all kinds of interesting people and even found a penny press machine. My son and I collect pressed pennies, so I was pleased to be able to add three more from this trip. I ended my day in Hollywood at my home away from home, Starbucks at Hollywood and Vine. I don’t usually do the touristy thing, but it was fun to visit somewhere I have seen on TV and in the movies for years.

Jenna & I being photo bombed by her makeup artist at the Makeover Party.

Jenna & I being photo bombed by her makeup artist at the Makeover Party.

I feel really fortunate to have been able to attend LA NMO Patient Day. It was an amazing experience and one I hope to be able to do again next year. I am also grateful for the new friends I made and the old friends I caught up with. Those connections are so incredibly important and I really believe together we are so much stronger. Thank you to Victoria Jackson, Bill Guthy and the GJF Foundation for hosting NMO Patient Day and for everything you do to fight for those living with NMO. Thank you for being all in.

09
Mar 2015
POSTED BY Lelainia Lloyd
DISCUSSION 3 Comments

Happy Birthday Allen

Happy 3rd Birthday Allen! I can’t believe three years have gone by already. I feel so blessed that I am his mother. Every year around his birthday I can’t help myself to reflect on the journey Eric and I went on to have him. I remember when I was first diagnosed I just cried cause we didn’t know for sure if I could have kids and if I would pass NMO on to them. After seeing some pretty incredible doctors they assured me I could get pregnant and there was a very small chance I could pass NMO onto my children. I am just so happy and blessed Allen is a healthy boy!

 

Allen is quite the character and really building up his personality. I have really seen him grow up this last year. I love how much he can talk now and the stuff he comes up with can always make Eric and I get a good laugh. He is 100% boy; He loves his cars, tractors and trains. His favorite thing to do is tell me he is a racecar and makes racing noises as he runs through the house. Allen is almost 100% potty trained we have been working with him for a month now and he is getting pretty darn good at it. Allen also got a new room and bunk beds this last month. He was pretty excited since I decorated his room in cars for him. He now calls his old room the baby’s room. Allen kind of knows there is a baby coming soon. If you ask him where the baby is he points to my tummy. I know he will be a great big Brother!

 

Can patients living with an illness find love?

It’s Valentine’s Day this week, that overly commercialized “holiday” where we acknowledge our loved one with chocolate, gifts and heart felt (usually by someone else) cards. Love it or hate it, one might find the day difficult to ignore.

On occasion I scan the posts on the support sites and Facebook groups and every once in awhile I’ll see the gut-wrenching, heart-sinking comment from someone young who wonders if they’ll ever find love despite Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO).

I’m here to say YES! YES YOU CAN!!

I’m blessed, in fact all of us on this blog are, to have someone to share our lives with. That’s the good, the bad and yes, the ugly NMO.

Look, Valentine’s Day can make even the most beautiful, healthy, young man or woman feel self-conscious when they face the day alone and single – so don’t sweat it. The tough reality about NMO is that everything is, well, in fact tougher.
Be it cooking, walking, sleeping and even love and romance, we face hardships most will never understand. In truth, there isn’t really a good moment to tell someone you’re dating about the realities of an auto-immune disease. It’s not exactly first date conversation material…or second date…or third…The good news? Dating is tough for everyone and each person brings what some might refer to as “baggage”. I like to refer to it as being human, vulnerable and real. I like that no one is perfect.

I always wonder what it is about disease that makes people feel lesser than others. Are NMO patients of a lesser value human being than anyone else? We certainly contribute the same (and often more!) to society through our work, families and empathy to others.

So go ahead and put yourself out there. And if you choose not to do so because you’re happier alone and not because NMO stopped you.

(In full disclaimer I personally have come to adore Valentine’s Day because of discount chocolates the day after and my hopeless idealistic view of the world.)

Erin’s pregnancy update

I wanted to give everyone an update on how my pregnancy is going. The last 3 months have been challenging I have been really sick with a bad sinus infection, ear infection and bronchitis. I have been seeing up to 3 doctors a week trying to get me better but between being pregnant and having NMO I just can’t win. I am now on my fifth round of antibiotics and three different inhalers I am hoping this will do the trick. Eric has even been blessed with me not having a voice for over a week now. Other then that baby girl Miller is doing well she is over three pounds and is always moving around in my tummy. I am currently 32 weeks which is almost 7 ½ months and I have been really blessed and I have not been having any issues with my NMO I am still getting my CD 19 count checked every month by my neurologist. I got the green light this month to try to breast feed this time as long as a do some pulse steroids, I am very excited about this since with Allen I could not since I did Rituxan three hours after having him. I am hoping this time with breastfeeding I will not flare at all after having her.

These last 2 months are going to busy around here we will be moving Allen out of his room and into what use to be our office. He is joining the big kids club and getting bunk beds, He wants his room to be decorated in cars and planes. I am trying to complete this project in the next few weeks so he can get adjusted to being in a new room. I also need to start decorating Allen’s old room for baby girl and getting everything ready for her. This last weekend we went through our storage unit and pulled out all the baby stuff and the bassinett. I am defiantly in nesting mode and trying to get everything ready cause I know she will be here before I know it. I am trying not to drive Eric crazy with all the things that need to get done cause I feel like we are under the gun and I just want to have as much done as possible before she is born. As we all know your life is pretty hectic after having a baby not to mention having a three old adjust to having a baby sister now.

Disney World at Christmas

There’s something about seeing the castle that made me giddy, a reaction I wasn’t expecting. We never went to Disney World growing up – it just wasn’t something we could afford so I really had no expectation and no real understanding of what I missed as a child. When Sophie was still in the womb I used to talk about all the things I’d want her to experience. Disney was one of them. This year our work schedules aligned and we were able to get away at Christmas, something neither of us had done before. Sure, our family was a little peeved that we went away but for one year it was totally worth it.

Christmas at Disney is, well, magical. Even with 80,000 people it’s a special place. We had planned to take Sophie when she was older and I definitely still will do that but at 2.5 yrs old, she was overcome with joy. With reactions like this:

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And this:

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It was the best Christmas of my life. Seeing her reaction to her heroes, the castle, the parades and the rides will hold memories for a lifetime and then some.

Navigating through a large crowd, standing in long lines and walking all day does take its toll especially for someone with NMO (Neuromyelitis Optica). We stayed at a property close by and rented a car. We started early, took a break mid afternoon for a nap back at the condo then headed back for dinner and the evening parade or shows. On one of the days I asked for a Disability Access Card, which provides a return time on an attraction instead of waiting in lines. I found that extremely helpful because after our first day I secretly struggled with excruciating back pain where my lesions caused a flare up and swelling. If you ever have an opportunity to visit Disney but especially at Christmas, I highly recommend it. Here’s a few more pictures of our trip.

 

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CIRCLES Study, Canada

circles

So after the sorting out of a considerable amount of red tape, Canadians are finally able to participate in the NMO CIRCLES* Study in Canada!

Just before Christmas, I went out to UBC to meet with Katrina, who is the study supervisor so I could enrol. She arrived at our appointment with a binder that was about 3 inches thick, but she was quick to reassure me that there were huge sections of the paperwork we’d be able to skip over because a good portion of the information needed would be mined directly from my medical records. (I don’t envy the person who has to spend 2 weeks chasing down all those details!)

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Katrina asked me a ton of questions about my medical and geographical history. Some of the questions were really interesting and some of them were just plain weird-one reminded me of those dreaded math word problems I hated as a kid. (Katrina assured me that they are removing that particular question from future versions of the study.) Once all the information was gathered, she walked me over to the lab where they drew 9 vials of blood. This is about 4 tablespoons or 58.5 ml, which less than you would donate to a typical blood drive and it didn’t hurt at all. (My lab tech was excellent!) From there, the blood they collected would be broken down into 40 individual containers. All blood samples are labelled with a unique code-identifying information like my name or personal health number are not included. The blood samples are shipped immediately to the biorepository lab in the eastern United States were they remain until researchers working with the Guthy-Jackson Foundation apply for samples to work with.

blood draw

All in all, it took about 3 ½ hours for the entire process. Follow up appointments for the study will be shorter, as there should be less paperwork. While I was having my blood drawn, I learned that I am the first Canadian to have blood drawn for the CIRCLES Study in Canada! Cool!

I signed up for this study because this disease can leave us feeling pretty powerless. I think that one way we can counteract that feeling is by helping to further research, through our blood and medical information. It requires a bit of a time commitment, but I am making a conscious choice to take time out to help researchers learn more about NMO so they can search for a cure in the hope that someday none of us will have to endure losing our vision or mobility or to be fighting for our lives.

Currently, UBC is the only site in Canada enrolling NMO patients for the CIRCLES Study. If you are interested in participating in this study or would like more information, you can get in touch with Katrina McMullen at katrina.mcmullen@ubc.ca or call 778-320-5038.

 

*The Collaborative International Research in Clinical and Longitudinal Experience for Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO) Studies

05
Jan 2015
POSTED BY Lelainia Lloyd
POSTED IN

NMO

DISCUSSION 6 Comments
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What to tell our children about NMO?

Despite this blog, I’m a very private person. I go about my day without anyone really knowing the pain I’m in. I rarely (closer to never) complain and most of my family and friends forget that I suffer from Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO). But truthfully, some days aren’t good. On my “bad days” I tend to go into hiding, I work from home, I sadly cancel on social outings. I’m okay with that now. My husband is the closest who gets it (as best as any non-patient could), watching me in quiet agony sometimes and I’m sure overhearing my private pep talks to push through the day. And now my daughter is also privy to my suffering.

So how much do I tell her?

My daughter is 2 and a half now. As a mother I’ll do anything to protect her from the realities of this world. I don’t want her to know pain, sadness, disappointment for as long as I can. She’s growing up so fast and I’m often disgusted how quickly our world wants our children to mature. Don’t get me wrong – I don’t want to raise an ignorant, immature brat, but I do want her to enjoy being a princess, blowing bubbles in her milk and laughing at funny faces we make because she (and every child) deserves that.

On my bad days she’s seen me struggle a little bit. On those days I know a look she has on her face, that is a mix of understanding I’m not my usual energetic self with a lot of worry that something isn’t just right. It’s that look that breaks my heart. It makes me worry about that inevitable day, the one when another major attack happens, because it will, and we’ll have to figure out a way to explain it. I’m not pessimistic but a realist who thinks we should be as best prepared as we can be.

I don’t know if this is the right answer (like all parenting conundrums) but when she’s old enough or when I’m forced to find a way to explain it, I will tell her my harsh reality. And that’s ok because I want her to understand that sometimes bad things happen to good people and strong people can have weaknesses. What I have resolved so far is this – NMO will be my battle, not hers. I hope for a cure one day but if things become more challenging as we both age I’ll want her to go and live her life  and not become my caregiver. I hope I raise her well that she’ll want to be but of course, I won’t let her. I know I’ll potentially get some grief about this; there are a lot of families that believe one should take care of their elderly, and yes, there’s a certain sweetness and sense of responsibility I respect about that value. But I hope for my daughter to be braver than me, stronger, smarter, healthier than me and I want her to take that and be impactful to our world, not just impactful to me. 

16
Dec 2014
POSTED BY Jenna
POSTED IN

Family, NMO, Uncategorized

DISCUSSION 1 Comment