#SorryNotSorry

IMG_0395Hi everyone, I hope this finds you all reasonably well. I am still pretty sick and no closer to knowing the why of it. I’ve had a ton of blood tests. Yesterday’s blood draw was nine vials and apparently the mixing of my blood with…wait for it…viper venom (Seriously!) as part of one test. I hate snakes and that little nugget of information totally creeped me out. I am having a CT with contrast later this week to see if they can figure out what’s going on. At this point, I really don’t care what it is, as long as we can make the pain stop.

I’ve been thinking how when I get seriously ill, I struggle really hard to keep my commitments. It’s this hardcore, deeply ingrained thing of wanting to keep my word, but at the same time, I bow out of being social-I can’t commit to hanging out with anyone. I used to apologise for this (because Canadians are painfully polite and we apologise without even thinking about it) but I’ve consciously stopped doing it. At this point, if you are in my life, you know I live with chronic illness and this is part of the package of being friends with me. Sometime I have to withdraw into my own little world as a measure of self-care. (Or survival, if I’m being totally honest.)

It’s been interesting to see how people react to having a friend with chronic illness. I’ve had my fair share of people who simply walked away. In the beginning, it was painful, but over time, I’ve shifted how I think about it. I realized that it has everything to do with them and really nothing to do with me.  I have a sacred circle of old friends who have been there for me, no matter what. They are my rocks. I also have some amazing new friends I would never have connected with if it weren’t for my illness. Many of them live with chronic illness and/or disability themselves, so they get it. There’s a comfort in being a part of a community of people that you don’t have to explain yourself to. We can talk about the hard stuff without it being weird or awkward. (And sometimes, we can laugh about it too!)

I think that serious and chronic illnesses can test any relationship. In some ways it changes who you are. When I am in a lot of pain, I don’t have the energy to be the kind of friend I want to be. As much as I don’t like it, this is part of who I am now and  it doesn’t feel good to have to apologise for being myself.

So….this is me.  I am who I am, no apologies.

04
Apr 2017
POSTED BY Lelainia Lloyd
DISCUSSION No Comments
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The Holiday Season is Here!

As I am gearing up for the next few weeks it’s going to be very busy time. First I would like to wish everyone a Happy Thanksgiving! We are traveling to Kansas to see my husband’s family this year for 4 days. This time of the year just seems like chaos for everyone till after New Year’s. As NMO patients this can be challenging for us trying to keep up with everything and trying to take of ourselves. I know for me this time of year is very exhausting and for that I need to thank Starbucks since I will be visiting them everyday till after New Year’s.  Once we get back from Kansas I will be decorating the house for Christmas. I am one of those weird people that put up four Christmas trees because I love Christmas trees! Also it’s that time of the year for Elf on the Shelf to appear and this year we are having another elf joining our elf Buddy I love doing elf on the shelf even though I stress about it too much some times. The look on Allen’s face is just worth it every morning when he is looking for Buddy. The following weekend we are staying downtown for one night and will be watching the Christmas lights parade. Then it will be my 35th birthday which I am absolutely dreading to me that means I am 5 years closer to being 40. I think I will have a hard time with that one well I know I will. I recently watched that movie “This is 40.” Yes I will be like her and will be celebrating my 38th birthday for several years. Four days after my birthday I will be doing my Rituxan which we all know that’s a party in its self. Which means I will not be feeling well for a couple weeks. The next thing on my schedule is my husband’s company Christmas party. Which means Eric and I will be wrapping about twenty gifts for the Christmas party gift raffle. Also squeezing in wrapping all the gifts for the kids and family members. I am hoping I will have time to do Christmas cookies with the kids. Started this tradition with Allen ever since he was a baby. Alana was not into it last year but I think this year she will be more into it. Well at least eating the frosting out of the bowl when I am not looking. Then before I know it will be Christmas. We are staying home this year for Christmas so the kids can enjoy playing with their toys.

Even though it will be a hectic time of the year, I am very thankful for the many blessing in my life such as my family. I think we all can to relate to that when it’s the holiday time we forget what matters the most sometimes.

 

 

Washington D.C and Dr.Levy

Two weeks ago I had an Appointment with Dr. Michael Levy at John Hopkins. Since Eric and I were traveling all the way from Colorado we decided to Make a long weekend trip and see some of the Monuments in Washington D.C. It was my first time to the east coast and it has been over 10 years since Eric was there. We decided it would be best to leave the kids at home and enjoy a couple’s getaway.

 

Our flight left late Wednesday night and we flew into Dulles we arrived at 11:30 p.m. Time we got the rental car and drove to the hotel which was in Old town Alexandria in Virginia. It was 1:00 a.m. so we were exhausted. Thursday morning we slept in little and woke up and explored Old town for a while and had breakfast before heading into D.C. We decided to take the metro train into D.C so we didn’t have to worry about parking and traffic. We got off the train at the National Archives and walked through the National Mall heading to the Washington Monument. I couldn’t believe all the museums at the National Mall. You could spend weeks going through all the Smithsonian Malls and other museums. As we approached the Washington Memorial it was just incredible how tall it was and all the different people from around the world was just staring up to the top of it.

 

Next we walked down to the World War II monument that was very beautiful to see and peaceful. As we headed to the Lincoln memorial we walked right along the reflecting pool. Which is way bigger in person then what you see on TV. When we were at the bottom of the Lincoln memorial I was thinking how am I going to climb all these steps since my NMO Symptoms are starting to hurt from walking so much? I have been walking a ton and I didn’t want to burn myself out since we still want to go see the Vietnam Wall and the White House. When I slowly climbed the stairs to the Lincoln monument and reached the top it was just gorgeous to see! It was remarkable to see how big it is and seeing it on T.V is just not the same. The Lincoln memorial was my favorite memorial to see by far. Once we were done looking at it and reading all the stuff from Lincoln we sat on top of the steps and people watched. I just could not get over how many foreigners where there looking at our American History. The sad part that there were not very many Americans there looking at our history. I had to rest for little bit before we started to walk down all the steps.

 

The next memorial we looked at was the Vietnam wall that was very humbling to see. Just seeing all the names and all the flowers and gifts people leave there at the wall. After that we caught a cab to head over to the White house since I was getting worn down. It was kind of crazy getting out of the cab and having to walk to get close to the White House. Since you can longer drive on the street in front of the white house and the back of the white house. The have barricades up so you can’t even get close to the fence that surrounds the house. The secret Service guys are very on point and can be a little rude and kind of jumpy with people. We simply just walked all around the White house then I had to take a rest on the Southside of the lawn. So we could walk even more to get back to the train station and head back to Old Town. When we arrived back to Old Town we ate at a great Oyster bar called Hank’s Oyster’s I highly recommend checking it out if you are ever in that area. By time dinner was over we were wiped out and ready for bed since we had a 45-minute drive to Johns Hopkins in the morning and I needed to be there at 9:30 a.m.

 

Friday morning bright and early with a Starbucks in my hand we headed off to Baltimore to John Hopkins to see Dr. Levy. Eric was worried that traffic would be very bad and would take awhile to get there. We made good timing arriving at 9:00a.m. I have always enjoyed Dr.Levy I have seen and listen to him speak at Guthy Jackson Patient Day for seven years. I have always wanted to fly out and go see him and I was thrilled I got that opportunity, Dr. Levy and I spent a over an hour going through my NMO history and what issues I would like to address. He would like to switch some medications around and do some blood tests and follow up in a few weeks. Since I have been diagnosed for 8 years there was a lot of information that needs to be talked about. Plus he wants to look at my MRI’s when I was first diagnosed to my latest MRI’S to see how my lesions are doing.

 

After leaving the Hospital we drove around Baltimore a little bit then we went to a crab place that had really good reviews for crab. Eric wanted crabs right out of the bucket. Like when he lived in Virginia Beach. So that was a nice lunch. We decided to take a scenic route back to D.C I wanted to check out Georgetown. LOL it seemed like a good idea but it kind of a pain but we made it to Georgetown the next tricky part was finding parking. It took us awhile but Eric got it done. I wanted to go shopping and stop at my favorite cupcake store Sprinkles! If anyone really knows me I am very addictive to these cupcakes. If I am visiting a city and they have Sprinkle store I will be most defiantly will be stopping by and buying cupcakes. After shopping for a while we headed back to the hotel and rested for a bit and went to a late dinner at a fabulous Southern food restaurant called Hen’s Quarters. It was the best-fried chicken I have had in a long time. We took a nice stroll down King Street after dinner and headed back to hotel cause we were pretty beat.

 

Saturday was a very special day we decided to spend the day at Arlington Cemetery. I wanted to see the tomb of the unknown solider and the changing of the guard. But also were the Kennedy’s are buried. Also I wanted to spend our last day at a place that was not going to be too crowded with people and was going to be not so noisy and just spend a quite day getting ready to go back to reality. I loved watching the changing of the guard and over all seeing the cemetery and seeing where JFK is buried. We spent about 4 hours walking around the cemetery. We headed back to hotel around 3 and went to a local bar and had a few drinks and went shopping a little bit then off to Hank Oyster Bar again because they had the best crab cake we found during our vacation. We enjoyed our last romantic dinner. Since we had an early flight on Sunday Morning.

Now that I am back home I am still waiting to hear back about the blood tests and on Friday I have an Appointment with my neurologist about what Dr.Levy said and the new medications I Need to try. So I will keep you all posted!

http://hanksoysterbar.com

http://www.henquarter.com

https://sprinkles.com

 

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Medicinal Marijuana for NMO

Throughout my NMO journey I’ve tried to keep an open mind towards alternative medicines. I’ve had great success with naturopathic care, acupuncture and osteopathy so when many of my trusted friends suggested cannabis, or medicinal marijuana, I thought it worthwhile to look into it. Cannabis has a bad reputation; Many people think marijuana is for a bunch of hippies getting high and eating Cheetos. Others think getting a marijuana prescription is just for those making up mild conditions who want to get high. Whilst both might be true in our world there are some fantastic testimonials from real patients.

I’m not the type to role a joint and get high but throughout my research I discovered CBD oil, or Cannabidiol, which can be consumed with a few drops on food, in drinks or straight under the tongue.  You can even diffuse CBD oil but others in the room will also feel the effects. There are many strains that have low or no THC levels, which is the component that gives the feeling of being high. I was transparent with my family doctor that medicinal marijuana was something I was considering. He was honest that he didn’t have extensive experience nor could he prescribe it but he did refer me to a reputable clinic that did.

marijuana

I’m fortunate that a close friend happens to be a key sales rep for one of the major distributors of medicinal marijuana products in North America. He spent a lot of time understanding my symptoms and suggesting the best CBD oil products. Here are my take-aways of CBD oil:

  • It still stinks. If you dislike the skunky smell of marijuana you still won’t like the oil.
  • Marijuana strains are very different and have names like Indica, Sativa or Hybrid. ie. Some help with insomnia, pain management, fatigue and/or several different combinations.
  • Each production changes so although manufacturers try to keep the potency levels as close to the last run it’s never exact. Remember, marijuana is a plant.
  • Because of production changes, prescriptions suggest amounts but the patient will need to dose up or down for each new bottle.

I tried CBD oil for several days and I’ve made the decision it isn’t for me. I dosed up and then more (and then more) and could never get the same relieve prescription medication provides me. I struggled with the taste (it was not that noticeable but did have an aftertaste) and after a certain amount I did feel somewhat paranoid. The one positive about CBD oil was that it helped with my insomnia but my other needs were not met. I felt frustrated trying to convert the prescribed grams into millilitres and then into how many drops that translated into.

I think there’s a place for medicinal marijuana but we’re still in the infancy stage. Doctors don’t have enough historical data to understand how the drug might best help different diseases. I can certainly see how marijuana might one day be part of the treatment plan for NMO patients and I know many who already do. The marijuana drug industry is regulated (and legal in many countries and states) but it’s tough for governments to monitor it. Uneducated patients may purchase from small retailers instead of one of the larger manufacturers direct and might purchase marijuana that is unsafe (ie. With pesticides or cross contamination). If you do decide that medicinal marijuana is something you want to try spend the time researching and choose a reputable clinic, doctors and distributors.

In Survival Mode

Things have been quiet at my end for the last 3 months because I’ve been pretty sick. My time has been taken up with medical appointments, tests, referrals and just trying to survive. I’ve spent a lot of time in bed, feeling awful. That’s not my normal-I am usually quite busy and like it that way.

To try and keep myself entertained I’ve been falling back on photography, which I enjoy. I have a DSLR camera, but it’s too heavy to lug around, especially when I’m not feeling well and seeing as my “outings” are simply to walk my dog, my iPhone has been my go-to. Nothing wrong with an iPhone camera-it does just fine, as you can see.

 

indysummer2016

Being home more has meant my best friend Indiana Jones has been keeping me company. He’s a good pal to nap with. I did manage to get up to the lake early one morning before it got too hot and manage to capture this half out of frame shot of him with his water Kong, which I actually really like.

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It’s also meant slowing down and noticing the small details around me like the lichen and moss on the bark of a tree in the park near our home and the secret apple tree I found by accident. I am now watching these apples and plan to pick some when they are big enough!

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The Olympics are now on, followed by the Paralympics. Anyone who knows me, knows I am a huge fan of the Games. I’ve been watching on my iPad and cheering for Team Canada. Team Canada is made up of 60% women athletes! Our ladies have been having huge success and we’re only on day 3! I am watching women’s footie (soccer) and women’s 7’s rugby obsessively. GO CANADA!!

So that’s pretty much been my summer in a nutshell. I am keeping this short because my vision is blurry and my hands are not typing as well as they usually do. I am waiting for treatment, which I am hoping to have booked some time in the next week or so. I am more than ready to get my life back.

 

08
Aug 2016
POSTED BY Lelainia Lloyd
DISCUSSION 2 Comments
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How to live with NMO and still enjoy your vacation

Christine with family in Vietnam

Family vacation in Vung Tau, Vietnam

We’re deep into the summer season, and that means summer vacations. I just got back from a month-long stint in Vietnam—a half-vacation, half-business trip—and while it feels spectacular to be home, travel is what I live for.

Travel opens your mind. It keeps you grounded. It makes you realize you are just a small speck in this universe, and that there is not necessarily a right or wrong, good or bad way to do things. This is why I travel and why, when I’m asked, “How can I learn to be a better cook?,” I say, travel.

Of course, I also have Neuromyelitis Optica/NMO, and traveling, even for a healthy person, can be stressful on the mind and body. Before I step foot out the door, I must plan, plan, plan. Here is a practical checklist to ensure you have a great vacation in spite of NMO.

1. Pack your meds, both those you regularly require and those you may need for acute situations.

I always carry my trusty meds on me. In a little container I purchased from The Container Store, I stuff:


  • Prescription meds in case I experience symptomatic neuropathic pain
  • Over-the-counter meds like ibuprofen in case of aches or general pains,?li>
  • Vitamins that I take daily
  • OTC sleep aids of which I sometimes take half when trying to adjust to a new time zone

Sometimes I will pack a prescription course of corticosteroids (e.g. Dexamethasone) in case I experience a NMO flare-up while traveling; of course, you should consult with your neurologist first to see if this is a viable option for you.

The above is my personal rundown of meds I pack but, just as every patient’s NMO is different, your list of meds will also differ.

2. Bring your insurance card and any other information you may need in case of an emergency.

We all know NMO can be unpredictable. An attack can be triggered by stress, fatigue, allergic reactions to foreign foods—all things we encounter during travel. Sometimes, an attack can happen without a detectable reason. You never know when you might end up in the emergency room in another city or country, so make sure you bring along with you any information you might need should you find yourself in this unfortunate situation: your health insurance cards and information about NMO for the clinic staff (since it’s still unheard of by many), which you can obtain from the Guthy Jackson Foundation.

3. Wear and pack comfortable, breathable clothes and shoes.

Comfort is key when on vacation. My so-called “en route uniform” usually consists of a UNIQLO Airism top, black GapFit sweatpants, sneakers, and a lightweight cardigan. If I’m traveling for work and have to look halfway decent upon arrival, I’ll wear a tee-shirt dress, leggings, and slip-on Chelsea boots or flats. The essentials are always breathable, wrinkle-free apparel in which you can move freely, an unrestrictive waistline, and shoes that you can easily remove at airport security checkpoint. Layering is important )hence the short-sleeved tops accompanied by a thin cardigan) because you’ll more often than not find yourself going from mild climate to freezing temperatures aboard an airplane to makeup-melting temperatures at your tropical summer destination.

And if you do book a vacation to somewhere hot, consider bringing this cooling tel—just wet, shake, and place on the back of your neck to cool your body down.

Being in a new environment and getting there and back are stressful enough—minimize the stress by donning comfortable clothing.

4. Use your cane or request a wheelchair as needed.

Request a wheelchair to help you navigate the airport to preserve energy. This can be done as soon as you get dropped off at the airport curb—just flag down an airport employee and say you need wheelchair assistance to the gate.

You should be able to go through the special TSA security line reserved for the elderly, disabled, or those traveling with small children. Then when you get to your gate, tell the gate attendant you’ll needto pre-board. (Or if you have a cane or are seated in the wheelchair, they should automatically pre-board you.)

Navigating an airport is stressful enough, so take advantage of these services designed to alleviate travel fatigue.

5. Allow ample time for rest between activities.

Lastly, once you’ve reached your destination, make sure it’s truly a vacation. Avoid packing your schedule so tightly that you fail to relax and enjoy, which are the points of a vacation. Slow down so you don’t miss the unexpected, serendipitous discoveries of a new place.

I made this mistake when I backpacked through western Europe the summer after I graduated college. Of course, I was a lot younger then (and thus had the energy to run from museum to internet cafe to landmark to train station). But I remember being in Florence towards the tail end of my trip, and after seeing Michelangelo’s statue of David masterpiece, I just shrugged and thought to myself, “This is the umpteenth museum I’ve visited in Europe—they’re getting to be all the same.”

I regret letting that complacency settle in, and since then, I knew better than to overpack a vacation schedule. Now I allow myself more time for leisure and rest. After all, I can’t enjoy exploring when I’m exhausted. It’s nice to be able to go back to a “home base” (I.e. Hotel or airbnb) to get in a little R&R before hitting the streets again in search of the next site or restaurant.

So there you have it: my personal 5 tips for an enjoyable vacation in spite of NMO. Who said you can’t have fun, travel, and experience new things with NMO? Tell your NMO to buzz off—you’re on vacation!

01
Aug 2016
POSTED BY Christine
DISCUSSION 1 Comment
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Good mental health is critical to managing your physical health

I imagine I’m probably one of the worst patients to treat. I fully understand the advice I receive but I’m horrible at following them. We’ve all been told it; Stress can really affect how we handle existing and future problems arising from having neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and admittedly, I’m in the habit of taking on quite a lot.

stress

I love to work hard and I work to live well. The type who suffers from wanderlust, adventure and trying new things, I generally only operate at hyper speed. A couple of months ago I knew I was at yet another crossroad. Where previously I could manage daytime fatigue, the burning sensation and general pain, my body had started to feel sluggish, unresponsive and exhausted. I tried to sleep it off, eat well and rest but I couldn’t bounce back. I recently blogged about a flare as a result but still couldn’t feel better.  (more…)

Things Only NMO Patients Will Get

I missed this year’s NMO patient day but absolutely loved seeing all the posts and photos of past and new attendees connecting with each other. It’s what has inspired this week’s post that only NMO patients might appreciate.

1. (Upon seeing you in person) “I’m so glad you’re feeling better”
NMO patients always sympathize with the inevitable prednisone use, which causes weight gain including the dreaded “moon face”. Those who aren’t familiar might assume the weight loss or return to normal weight means you’re healed from the disease, but that’s just not the case. Prednisone is used to treat flare ups or as a precautionary measure.

2. “But you were walking yesterday. What’s wrong with you today?”
NMO symptoms can flare up and cause different mobility from day to day or even from hour to hour. This is tough for others to understand who don’t realize how symptoms work.

3. Having to cancel on your friends and family…again
This is related to #2 and the unpredictable nature of NMO. If you’re like me, you’ve probably had to make excuses that seem easier to understand like “my kid is sick” or “I’m stuck working late”. It can be heartbreaking for patients when the invitations stop coming because they assume you’ll probably have to cancel anyways.

4. The stubbed toe syndrome
Right now 3 of my 10 toes are badly bruised. That’s because my mobility gets thrown off, I walk into things because of the numbness and vertigo is sometimes a problem.

5. Healthcare is expensive
Even if you have extended health coverage, having a medical condition is very expensive. The medication alone can cost a fortune and that’s before any additional maintenance care like massage therapy, acupuncture or doctor appointments. And most patients can only work limited hours or survive on disability earnings.

6. We know how to navigate the medical system
This is a broad statement that might include best time to call for an MRI, the nicest nurse for blood work or even best time to pick up a prescription from the pharmacy. Most of us are even on a first name basis with our neurologist!

7. Food is our friend (and our enemy)
Eat what makes you feel good but that usually means really restrictive diets. Eating with others fuels our sense of belonging but people can get weird about our food limitations.

Staying fit in spite of NMO

Physical activity is important—it keeps your body moving, your heart pumping, your joints lubricated. Something I heard at an NMO conference before was, no matter what your physical limitation, there is some sort of exercise you can do. If you’re wheelchair-bound, you can work your upper body aerobically with an arm bicycle. If you fatigue easily, you can walk or do gentler exercises on your back. If you have joint issues, you can swim or join a water aerobic class. Even when I was paralyzed from the neck down in 2002 because of my Neuromyelitis Optica/NMO, my physical therapist had me try to sit up on my own for 30 seconds. Believe it or not, I broke a massive sweat just doing this mere exercise, but it raised my heart rate, made me work towards a goal, and perhaps most importantly, reminded me to be grateful for the times before and later that I was able to walk and sit up all by myself.

Nowadays, my main handicap is my vision, so my exercise routine can be pretty physical. Check out a typical session John and I have with our personal trainer in the YouTube video below.

Spring is coming, the snow is melting. I encourage you to get outdoors or, at the very least, get moving, in whatever capacity you can. I promise, you’ll feel productive and great.

07
Mar 2016
POSTED BY Christine
DISCUSSION 1 Comment
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Traveling with NMO

I’ve traveled a lot this year, so much that I now have 1K status on United Airlines. It’s a bittersweet feeling: on one hand, the perks are definitely nice, but on the other hand, it’s a constant reminder of how much time I’ve spent in the air.

Regardless, I still have Neuromyelitis Optica/NMO, and this makes traveling sometimes more worrisome. Traveling takes a toll on the body: the jet lag, the recycled air, the discomforts of being displaced for X days (or, in my case, even weeks). I must say, I’ve become a pro traveler by now. A tee-shirt dress and leggings are my travel uniform, as they offer a pulled together look that’s more importantly comfortable. Always wear slip-on flats or boots that will be easy to take off and on at security checkpoint. Carry a lightweight tote with lots of pockets and compartments to stash sunglasses, wallet, phone, hand sanitizer, lip balm, thin sweater, headphones, and white cane. I just wish I could be more efficient with my packing. I’ve heard of a certain fashion editor whose wardrobe is entirely black and white and gray, so she never has to waste time coordinating outfits. This is smart, but in spite of my vision impairment, I still need some color in my life.

Anyway, with the holidays just a few days away, to ensure safe and happy travels, here is my advice for those traveling with NMO.

1. Stay hydrated.

Traveling dehydrates you. I can tell because my skin gets out of whack every time I fly. Not only are you dealing with the recycled cabin air and pressure on planes, you’re tired from dealing with the crowds at airports and unfamiliar environments when away from home. Drink lots of water to stay hydrated. I often carry an empty bottle with me and fill it up once I get past security.

2. Travel with meds.

I’m one of the lucky few patients with NMO that doesn’t have to travel with a ton of meds. I myself receive the Rituxan infusion, so I only carry medicine for acute symptoms that may arise while traveling. In my small pill jar, I have ibuprofen for general headaches and an over-the-counter sleep aid just in case I’m traveling overseas and need a little help changing up my sleep pattern. As for prescriptions, obviously bring meds you need to take on a regular basis, but don’t forget ones like painkillers or anything else you might need for acute symptoms. I’ve even traveled before with a “just in case” 5-day course of oral steroids (which had proven useful ONCE when I was in Ethiopia and had an onset of transverse myelitis). Don’t forget to carry these meds with you in your carry-on!

3. Schedule plenty of rest time.

Take naps, and don’t apologize for them! You know your body best. I have to admit, this last advice is the hardest one for me to heed myself. I work hard, and I like to play hard, so my rest and sleep are often sacrificed. But I ain’t no spring chicken no mo’, so sometimes, I’ll make sure I get a full eight hours of sleep at night while traveling. Its’ hard, though, because I feel like I must take advantage of a new city by exploring everything it has to eat and so on. But I’ve noticed that I enjoy my travel experiences better when I’m well-rested after a full night’s slumber.

Those are my three main tips for traveling with NMO. Should you unfortunately experience a NMO attack while traveling, I would direct the medical staff to the Guthy Jackson website for more information on NMO, and hopefully you have a great primary neurologist whose staff you can reach at any time to get treatment support.

Safe travels this holiday season!

17
Dec 2015
POSTED BY Christine
DISCUSSION No Comments
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