Rituxan vs. Breastfeeding

I wanted to talk about the difference between when I had Allen compared to when I had Alana. I have had a very different experience with my NMO with each kid after I gave birth. After I had Allen I had to make sure I did Rituxan within 8 hours after childbirth. So needless to say I did not get much time with him after he was delivered. I had to go to a completely different floor to get my Rituxan since it’s a chemotherapy drug I had to be moved to the cancer floor. It took over 12 hours for them to infuse the Rituxan the nurse ran it very slow since I just gave birth. That was very hard for me as being a first time mom being away from my son for over 12 hours. By doing the Rituxan so quickly after childbirth my doctors were hoping it would help really decrease my chance having a relapse. After the first infusion I would have to do another round of Rituxan 2 weeks later at my doctors office. About week after my second round of Rituxan my NMO symptoms came back very badly. I started back on my daily symptom pills and was hoping for the best. About 9 months later I had a relapse ended up in the hospital to do PLEX. Within a month I had another Relapse ended back in the hospital for another round of PLEX. I was good for about 4 months when another relapse occurred and was admitted to the hospital again for another round of PLEX. After having Allen I really battle with my NMO even though I did my Rituxan very quickly it didn’t seem like it worked very well.

 

When I decided to have another baby this time I really wanted not to do Rituxan right after childbirth and try to breastfeed. Hoping that would maybe help prevent having a relapse. I had Alana 3 months ago and I am doing fairly well! Breastfeeding has been a challenge but I am hanging in there! My NMO symptoms are mild right now about a week ago they started coming back. The one symptom I am battling is horrible headaches, I went in for a nerve block and I hope it will work. I will honestly say I feel so much better breastfeeding vs doing Rituxan. My doctor is giving me till September to breastfeed then I will have to do Rituxan. I am hoping I will make it that long! I am being closely monitored by the doctors to make sure I do not flare. I go in every couple weeks to get my blood work checked, to make sure my levels are absolute. My whole family can’t believe so far how well I am doing with my NMO since having Alana. I am truly hoping this time I stay relapse free for awhile.

I have NMO. Now what am I supposed to eat?

If you’re like me you probably enjoy the occasional over-indulgence of food and usually the bad stuff. Growing up Dutch-Indonesian our meals often revolved around rice dishes, cooking oils and spices. I’ll admit that food, especially the quality of food, is usually the last thing on my mind. I’m not a poor eater but I am guilty of sporadic meal times, missing meals and binge eating. Having a child corrects some of my poor habits but as long as she’s eaten well and regularly I’m ok.

Since my NMO diagnosis several years ago I’ve really battled with food. Prednisone made me over-eat and the weight gain pulled me into a dark depression. I lost most of the weight only to pack it all back on when I was pregnant and then lose it all again. Over time I’ve read a lot of studies, testimonials and books on how diet can resist or improve neurological symptoms.

But I was overwhelmed.

It seemed like the more I read the more confused I became. Some argue a vegan diet while others argue gluten-free or soy-free. Scared of falling into a trap of another fad diet, I spoke with my doctors who all said the same thing – “everything in moderation.” A couple of summers ago I challenged myself to go vegetarian for 2 months, really just to force myself how to cook differently. What I found was that my body felt better, cleaner and more capable of handling the NMO symptoms. But I love steak too much…

So here we are at present. After more research and coaching from family members who also struggle with disease I’ve now spent the last month on the Paleo autoimmune protocol (AIP) diet. It’s restrictive, tough and unforgiving. The goal is to rid your body of all possible inflammatory foods then slowly introduce them back into your diet one at a time to identify which ones cause havoc on your body. My cousin best describes the feeling of Paleo AIP – “it is so powerful to use food and find control again of your body after so long”. Now, I’m not saying that I will ever be able to stop my regular meds and that my symptoms all magically went away BUT after the first week I already felt better.

I’ve just started introducing rice into my diet and so far there is a limit before I feel bloated and sick. I’m playing around with portions and I’m hoping that will make rice more tolerable. I don’t know if full on Paleo is my solution or even feasible but I know I’ve made a huge mindset change that will stay with me forever.

My gallery of Pinterest fails:

This is supposed to be the meat patties that provide my protein in the morning. They never turn out looking like perfect circle hamburger patties.

 

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Instead they turned out looking like burnt hockey pucks (but they still tasted really good).

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Desperate for sugar (I went into complete withdrawal after 2 days) I attempted to make beautiful coconut flour pancakes. They tasted horrible, like dry flour and no amount of maple syrup was making these better.

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This wasn’t a fail per se but I did miss potatoes. My family really enjoyed this roast.

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NMO and Pregnancy – A Patient’s Perspective

Both Erin and I have had successful pregnancies so we’re often asked how exactly we’ve done it. Truth is, no one really knows how we got so lucky (as we all know NMO is so unpredictable) but we did work with a great team of doctors, understood what we were getting into and built a plan that we think helped us stay on track.

Here’s our disclaimer: we are not doctors or ever think our opinion is superior. Pregnancy and NMO is not for everyone. This documentation is meant to provide insight into our journey and what we learned along the way. It’s meant as an external resource for those with Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO) who are considering pregnancy.

Q: I have NMO. Can I get pregnant?
A: Maybe. The reality is that there just aren’t enough documented cases of patients with NMO and pregnancy. There have been some successful cases, like ours and there have been some unsuccessful cases that have resulted in miscarriages and major NMO attacks.

Q: When is the best time for us to try getting pregnant?
A: Ideally you want as much time between your last attack and when you become pregnant. The longer time you provide your body with stability, the better. Our doctors recommended we wait several years before we even started the conversation about pregnancy. This is a conversation that should include your entire team of health care providers.

Q: I’m on a lot of medications. Are they safe for a pregnancy?
A: All immune suppressant medication, including Cellcept, Rituximab, and Imuran are classified as unsafe for pregnancy. Logically speaking, these drugs are meant to slow down an immune system, which doesn’t make sense for an unborn child who is developing an immune system inside you. There are several programs often affiliated with your local hospital that will help you determine which drugs are safer than others for use during a pregnancy, but remember, no drug is 100% safe during a pregnancy.

Q: But if I come off my medication won’t I suffer from another major attack?
A: Possibly. Ideally you want to wean off all unsafe medication (like immune suppressant drugs) and ramp up a suitable substitute (like prednisone) to provide you with some protection while you are pregnant. Only you can determine if you’re willing to take this risk with your body.

Q: Can I still try to get pregnant the good old fashion way?
A: You could but ideally you want to minimize the amount of time you are without the best treatment to protect you from another NMO attack. That’s why both of us decided to pursue in-vitro fertilization (IVF). That way we were able to time exactly when the unacceptable drugs were out of our system with a close date to when we would ideally be pregnant. Talk to your doctors to see if IVF is an option for you.

Q: What happens if I have an attack during my pregnancy?
A: This is something you’ll need to discuss as part of your plan and is very personal to you and your family. You’ll want to discuss your wishes with your team of doctors beforehand so everyone knows what you want should you experience an NMO attack during your pregnancy.

Q: Who should follow me medically while I am pregnant?
A: You’ll want to continue working with your existing medical team as they’ll be familiar with your history but you’ll also want to consider a high-risk obstetrician as some medication, like prednisone, can create additional problems like gestational diabetes, during your pregnancy.

Q: I’m worried about the delivery. Are there special considerations for patients with NMO?
A: It will depend on your wishes and what recommendations your team of doctors will make. Typically, if you’ve had a transverse myelitis (TM) attack you may want to consider a c-section to eliminate any extra pressure on your spine during delivery. Make sure you meet with your anesthesiologist beforehand to identify where the problem areas exist on your spine should you need or choose to get an epidural.

Q: My doctor wants me on my medication right after delivery but I really want to breastfeed. Can it be done?
A: It will depend how your pregnancy goes. If things go well you might have the option to delay your previous course of medication long enough to breastfeed for a period of time. Voice this desire with your doctors to build it into your plan. If you suffer from extreme symptoms or worse, an attack, during your pregnancy you’ll likely want to pursue the best treatment plan available as soon as possible so you can make sure you’re there for your new addition to your family. From our perspective we both chose to breastfeed for as long as it was safely recommended by our doctors – aside from all the regular benefits of breastfeeding, it also helped prolong the feeling of pregnancy for our bodies and allowed for a slower transition from pregnant to not pregnant, providing the opportunity to adjust.

Q: I’m worried I’ll gain a lot of weight during my pregnancy and will struggle to lose it once I start my treatment plan post-pregnancy. 
A: Like all new moms weight loss post pregnancy is a challenge. Build it into your plan to work with a nutritionist and set realistic goals knowing that movement isn’t always the easiest for NMO patients.

Q: Having NMO is already an emotional roller coaster. Can I handle a pregnancy?
A: Only you can answer that. Don’t get pressured into a pregnancy if you aren’t sure you can emotionally handle the unknowns and/or if you do not think your body can handle such physical changes. Be sure to have a positive support system available during the planning process, your pregnancy and available to assist post pregnancy. Be sure you talk through and agree on a plan for worse case scenarios.

An intimate interview with Nancy Reimer, NMO Advocate

This week we’d like to showcase another “Mom on a Mission” Nancy Reimer, who is the mastermind behind the very first dedicated NMO (neuromyelitis optica) Walk/Run. It’s difficult not to cry reading her candid response to our very intimate questions. Always honest, sincere and tough, Nancy took time to respond to our questions from her home in British Columbia, Canada.

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1. What motivated you to start the first NMO dedicated walk/run?

I think if I am being completely honest, my motivation for starting the first NMO dedicated Walk/Run was anger and grief. We all have our own ways of dealing with the tough stuff in life and for me I felt like if I did not find a positive outlet for my feelings of anger and grief surrounding Riley’s diagnosis, that I would likely go under and not resurface. It was excruciating as a Mom to go through that first year and to not have a diagnosis really until his fourth relapse. To hear the words “no cure” almost did me in, however, it was around that time that the idea to have an event specific to NMO entered my mind. Organizing this event gave me a positive focus…something that I could do in my own community to raise awareness and funding specifically for Neuromyelitis Optica. When I started planning the event, I was surprised that there were others with the diagnosis who immediately reached out to me. It then became something that extended out much further than Riley’s diagnosis.

2. Were you always planning to make it an annual event?

I remember the final weeks leading up to the first ever event thinking, “what if nobody comes”. Silly really, because so many had registered…we ended up with around 400 that first year. I think my thought process was to just see how year one went…then year two…and now we are leading up to year three! Never in my wildest dreams did I imagine that it would ever go beyond year one. It has become this incredible place of support for those who live with NMO and their families. This event has given us all something that we “CAN” do to make a difference. We cannot change the diagnosis, but we can rally together with our supporters and be there for each other while we educate our communities about NMO.

3. What improvements to the event are you planning for this year?

Each year I look at what worked and what did not. I have to say that both years so far have been pretty darn amazing. Last year we added a few more sponsors, a KidZone and onsite yoga classes. We were also delighted to have a local dance school come and do a flash mob at our event. The onsite Sponsors are incredible and most have been with us since year one. When looking for Sponsors, you are asking people/businesses in the community to believe in both the cause and that your event will succeed. You never know what kind of support exists unless you are willing to ask. So for this year, we have all of our amazing Sponsors coming back, some fantastic post-race entertainment and snacks…don’t forget the snacks!!!!

4. Fundraising certainly has its challenges. What advice would you give to those who do so yearly? How do you keep it relevant and fresh?

Fundraising has been a challenge. I struggled a lot with this aspect of the event last year. Our registration fees are part of our fundraising efforts and that is the easy part, but asking for donations above and beyond has, in the past, been a challenge. When you are asking people or businesses to donate, I have found that most need to have that personal connection to the cause for them to fully be able to identify with it. Unfortunately, many do not identify with Neuromyelitis Optica. Some are willing to listen, while others are not. I have learned to give a brief synopsis of the disease and leave a letter with more details and unfortunately, unless they take the time to read the letter or our personal story, I rarely hear back. That was tough for a few of us last year but then as we started to really look at the event, it occurred to us that maybe that’s not what this event is about. Yes, it is so amazing to be able to contribute financially to the cause and ultimately the cure, but maybe our event serves a different purpose. There is nothing that has been so healing to me as standing before that “sea of green” and seeing that visual support all at once. It is several communities standing together, unified in their support of a cause…our cause. There is not a price tag for that…the support onsite on event day is priceless!!!! To me, if I can provide that for the people who have this diagnosis, then I have done my job well.

5. Riley is another year older so he’s another year wiser. How do you feel this event impacts him on a personal level?

This is a tough one. Riley does not often verbalize what he feels about his diagnosis or about the event. He was only 7 when NMO entered his world and I think for him the event has just become a part of that. Perhaps as he gets older, he will realize more, like I have, the magnitude of the support that stands before him and that this event came to be because he was diagnosed with Neuromyelitis Optica. It was created based on his personal diagnosis. For Riley, life has really normalized in the past couple years. The beginning of May marks 3 years of stability for him. That is huge. I remember the panic of that first year and I wondered if this disease would ever give him a break or if it would be a lifetime of relapses, hospitals and rehab centres. I remember the severity of some of his relapses and wondered if he would live, if he would move, if he would walk again, if he would be able to see…we’ve come a long way baby!!! I am beyond grateful for his stability and he is very blessed to have an amazing team of Doctors that have made it their priority to keep him that way.

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6. To quote the Guthy-Jackson Foundation, you’re another “Mom on a mission”. How do you stay inspired and motivated?

My motivation wakes up in the room across the hall from me every morning. I walk in to see the mop of curls on his pillow. My heart still skips a beat when he does not respond right away. I have learned over the past few years, what it means to be a “Mom on a Mission”. Simply put, a Mom on a Mission is a woman driven by something that puts her child/children in danger, and will fight to the ends of the earth to change that for her child/children. I have had that feisty attitude my whole life and I am learning now to channel it into something good. Both of my children know, without a doubt, that I will always fight for them and will bulldoze anything, Neuromyelitis Optica included, that puts them in danger. The last couple of years have been hard for me. Once I got through that initial flurry of the first year full of attacks, diagnosis and then, finally, stability, I saw the damage…the backlash of the ordeal. The thing is, when you are fighting for a child, your child, you do not feel the plummet to the bottom of the totem pole. I was not a priority and have suffered more than most know, as I have become quite good at just carrying on with life. A car accident in the midst of all of this, just added to that by introducing chronic pain into my body. This year so far has been about healing me. I am, as best as I can, making myself and my own health and recovery, a priority. I still have moments where I plummet, but I never camp there for very long. I have a job to do and in order to do that; I need to be the strongest, healthiest version of me. My motivation now reaches around the globe. My fight is no longer just about my child anymore. It is about every person, anywhere, who has received diagnosis the of Neuromyelitis Optica. We are this amazing family and I honestly do not know how I have lived my life up to this point without these incredible people in my life. I am inspired and motivated daily by the people who were brought into my life through this diagnosis. I am so very proud to be a part of a rare disease family that together will find a cure for Neuromyelitis Optica…I truly believe that!!!!

7. Tell us how people can get involved and all the details of this year’s event.

7. You can get involved in our event by being there if you are able to do so. For those who cannot be physically there, we added a Virtual Participant option to our registration, last year, which allows anyone…anywhere in the world, to register for $10 and support our event and the cause. To symbolize that support, I write all of the virtual participant’s names on my shirt and wear it to the event so it is as if you are there. My goal this year would be to have a really full shirt of names. Our event supports two charities… The UBC NMO Clinic and Research Program and the Guthy-Jackson Charitable Foundation. Donation links to both are available on our family website along with the link to register for our event.
You can visit our website to register, make a donation or view our videos, photos and press from years 1 and 2 of our NMO Walk/Run. nomorenmo.com

Happy Birthday Allen

Happy 3rd Birthday Allen! I can’t believe three years have gone by already. I feel so blessed that I am his mother. Every year around his birthday I can’t help myself to reflect on the journey Eric and I went on to have him. I remember when I was first diagnosed I just cried cause we didn’t know for sure if I could have kids and if I would pass NMO on to them. After seeing some pretty incredible doctors they assured me I could get pregnant and there was a very small chance I could pass NMO onto my children. I am just so happy and blessed Allen is a healthy boy!

 

Allen is quite the character and really building up his personality. I have really seen him grow up this last year. I love how much he can talk now and the stuff he comes up with can always make Eric and I get a good laugh. He is 100% boy; He loves his cars, tractors and trains. His favorite thing to do is tell me he is a racecar and makes racing noises as he runs through the house. Allen is almost 100% potty trained we have been working with him for a month now and he is getting pretty darn good at it. Allen also got a new room and bunk beds this last month. He was pretty excited since I decorated his room in cars for him. He now calls his old room the baby’s room. Allen kind of knows there is a baby coming soon. If you ask him where the baby is he points to my tummy. I know he will be a great big Brother!

 

Can patients living with an illness find love?

It’s Valentine’s Day this week, that overly commercialized “holiday” where we acknowledge our loved one with chocolate, gifts and heart felt (usually by someone else) cards. Love it or hate it, one might find the day difficult to ignore.

On occasion I scan the posts on the support sites and Facebook groups and every once in awhile I’ll see the gut-wrenching, heart-sinking comment from someone young who wonders if they’ll ever find love despite Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO).

I’m here to say YES! YES YOU CAN!!

I’m blessed, in fact all of us on this blog are, to have someone to share our lives with. That’s the good, the bad and yes, the ugly NMO.

Look, Valentine’s Day can make even the most beautiful, healthy, young man or woman feel self-conscious when they face the day alone and single – so don’t sweat it. The tough reality about NMO is that everything is, well, in fact tougher.
Be it cooking, walking, sleeping and even love and romance, we face hardships most will never understand. In truth, there isn’t really a good moment to tell someone you’re dating about the realities of an auto-immune disease. It’s not exactly first date conversation material…or second date…or third…The good news? Dating is tough for everyone and each person brings what some might refer to as “baggage”. I like to refer to it as being human, vulnerable and real. I like that no one is perfect.

I always wonder what it is about disease that makes people feel lesser than others. Are NMO patients of a lesser value human being than anyone else? We certainly contribute the same (and often more!) to society through our work, families and empathy to others.

So go ahead and put yourself out there. And if you choose not to do so because you’re happier alone and not because NMO stopped you.

(In full disclaimer I personally have come to adore Valentine’s Day because of discount chocolates the day after and my hopeless idealistic view of the world.)

Disney World at Christmas

There’s something about seeing the castle that made me giddy, a reaction I wasn’t expecting. We never went to Disney World growing up – it just wasn’t something we could afford so I really had no expectation and no real understanding of what I missed as a child. When Sophie was still in the womb I used to talk about all the things I’d want her to experience. Disney was one of them. This year our work schedules aligned and we were able to get away at Christmas, something neither of us had done before. Sure, our family was a little peeved that we went away but for one year it was totally worth it.

Christmas at Disney is, well, magical. Even with 80,000 people it’s a special place. We had planned to take Sophie when she was older and I definitely still will do that but at 2.5 yrs old, she was overcome with joy. With reactions like this:

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And this:

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It was the best Christmas of my life. Seeing her reaction to her heroes, the castle, the parades and the rides will hold memories for a lifetime and then some.

Navigating through a large crowd, standing in long lines and walking all day does take its toll especially for someone with NMO (Neuromyelitis Optica). We stayed at a property close by and rented a car. We started early, took a break mid afternoon for a nap back at the condo then headed back for dinner and the evening parade or shows. On one of the days I asked for a Disability Access Card, which provides a return time on an attraction instead of waiting in lines. I found that extremely helpful because after our first day I secretly struggled with excruciating back pain where my lesions caused a flare up and swelling. If you ever have an opportunity to visit Disney but especially at Christmas, I highly recommend it. Here’s a few more pictures of our trip.

 

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What to tell our children about NMO?

Despite this blog, I’m a very private person. I go about my day without anyone really knowing the pain I’m in. I rarely (closer to never) complain and most of my family and friends forget that I suffer from Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO). But truthfully, some days aren’t good. On my “bad days” I tend to go into hiding, I work from home, I sadly cancel on social outings. I’m okay with that now. My husband is the closest who gets it (as best as any non-patient could), watching me in quiet agony sometimes and I’m sure overhearing my private pep talks to push through the day. And now my daughter is also privy to my suffering.

So how much do I tell her?

My daughter is 2 and a half now. As a mother I’ll do anything to protect her from the realities of this world. I don’t want her to know pain, sadness, disappointment for as long as I can. She’s growing up so fast and I’m often disgusted how quickly our world wants our children to mature. Don’t get me wrong – I don’t want to raise an ignorant, immature brat, but I do want her to enjoy being a princess, blowing bubbles in her milk and laughing at funny faces we make because she (and every child) deserves that.

On my bad days she’s seen me struggle a little bit. On those days I know a look she has on her face, that is a mix of understanding I’m not my usual energetic self with a lot of worry that something isn’t just right. It’s that look that breaks my heart. It makes me worry about that inevitable day, the one when another major attack happens, because it will, and we’ll have to figure out a way to explain it. I’m not pessimistic but a realist who thinks we should be as best prepared as we can be.

I don’t know if this is the right answer (like all parenting conundrums) but when she’s old enough or when I’m forced to find a way to explain it, I will tell her my harsh reality. And that’s ok because I want her to understand that sometimes bad things happen to good people and strong people can have weaknesses. What I have resolved so far is this – NMO will be my battle, not hers. I hope for a cure one day but if things become more challenging as we both age I’ll want her to go and live her life  and not become my caregiver. I hope I raise her well that she’ll want to be but of course, I won’t let her. I know I’ll potentially get some grief about this; there are a lot of families that believe one should take care of their elderly, and yes, there’s a certain sweetness and sense of responsibility I respect about that value. But I hope for my daughter to be braver than me, stronger, smarter, healthier than me and I want her to take that and be impactful to our world, not just impactful to me. 

16
Dec 2014
POSTED BY Jenna
POSTED IN

Family, NMO, Uncategorized

DISCUSSION 1 Comment

Should NMO patients get the flu shot?

Getting the flu shot is a personal choice. What do I mean by that? As a neuromyeltis optica (NMO) patient I’ve never received a concrete answer as to whether the merits of said flu shot outweigh any potential risks. So that’s what makes it a personal choice; that it is completely up to me to take what little information is available and make a somewhat educated decision. Let me take a step back…

I trust my team of doctors. Since my first attack I’ve always been treated with respect, have had the opportunity to voice my concerns and have always received honest answers. And I’m grateful because I know some patients don’t share my opinion about their healthcare, some even sharing the same team of doctors. Every year I have this discussion and every year there’s still not enough evidence. My neurologist is unsure how my symptoms will react, my general physician sees no harm and my rheumatologist strongly disagrees with the shot for those with compromised immune systems. They all make strong arguments and again, I emphasize, I trust them. I also respect them so much more for just being honest and saying, ‘collectively, we don’t know what the answer is for sure’.

So every year I choose not to get the flu shot. Truthfully, I’m tired of all the drugs in my system so one less excites me.  And I hate needles so if I can avoid one I typically do. But last year my daughter, then a year and a half, came home sick from daycare so often I coined the phrase, “sick diet”, which I attribute to my post-baby weight loss. This year started no different. As soon as the leaves started to change my daughter came home with a cold and I in turn caught it, which became a week long body shutdown. Not wanting to be sick for most of the winter again this year, I opted to try the flu shot finally. On a routine check up with my general physician he suggested the flu shot, which was available right then if I wanted it. It was 8am on a Monday morning prior to a hectic week of work. Sure, some patients feel a little unwell but we guessed the worse I’d feel is a sore arm at the injection site. I have after all, been taking good care of myself, working out regularly, eating and sleeping. As the fluid entered my arm I instantly felt unwell. I started to sweat, developed a headache and my body ached. And the NMO burning…the burning…And just as the nurse put the bandaid on the nausea hit me like the worst stomach bug I’ve ever had. Thankfully a waste bucket was in the room and my modest breakfast found itself in it. Thinking I could just push through my day I headed to my office but within the hour it was evident I had the full blown flu. It took me another week to recover from that teeny, tiny needle. 

I want to put out my disclaimer here: this experience is by no means my opinion that NMO patients shouldn’t get the flu shot. I also want to make it clear that the reaction I had could also have happened to any other person who doesn’t have NMO. I’ve had one bad experience with the flu shot and that’s not enough evidence to determine a pro or against stance. 

If you’re like me and unsure about the flu shot don’t wait until mid season before you make a decision. If you decide against it, encourage your family members close to you to get theirs. Also, I want to reiterate that every NMO patient is different so always consult with your team of doctors.

#TOUGHLIKEME

On September 20th, 2 days before my 5 year anniversary from my first major neuromyelitis optica (NMO) attack, which was a transverse myelitis (TM) attack that left me in a wheelchair for quite some time, I managed to finish a 10 kilometre run with a few members of my family. Originally encouraged by my Uncle Roy who just turned 65 and is planning to run 5 major world marathons, he set out to encourage us younger family members to get active.

This is my family pre 10k race. We’re all still so shiny and clean here. Note that it was really chilly (only 8 degrees celsius) but we warmed up quick!

before the run

 

This is me with my biggest supporter (mainly ’cause he listens to me whine a lot), my husband, Mike. After all these years, this is probably my favourite photo of us.

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My pre-race message to other NMO patients. I call out other patients of any disease to find their #TOUGHLIKEME moment and be your own hero.

My uncle led us in a big team huddle with some inspiring words.

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And finally after the months of training and hard work, here’s my finish to my run.

This is my family after the run. My Uncle Roy (the R) made us all t-shirts to represent a letter in our last name.  It was rather fitting to run it with my cousins and Uncle and Aunt. When I think about it now these are a few of my biggest supporters especially during my early days of NMO. My uncle in black didn’t run it but he jumped in the photo to be our “space” in our last name. Don’t get confused – van Amerom is my maiden name but I’m now legally (and proudly) a Drolet.

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This is me (in the middle) with my cousins, Allison (left) and Gudrun (right). Allison barely trained but she raises a bunch of kids and runs a farm/vineyard so she’s always running around. And Gudrun ran herself thin for a few years now and was able to keep up with her brothers who are total machines. I’m so proud of both of them.Zoo6

 

To check out my time results compared to all of the other 3000 runners click here. I finished at 1:14:11, which beat my goal of 1:15 but just barely. I’m already trying to decide which run I’ll tackle next.